Listen to Last Friday’s Gobbledygeek

The graduating class of Sunnydale High School 1999.

Totally slipped my mind to make this post yesterday morning, so here we go: Friday’s Gobbledygeek, “Higher Education,” is available for listening right here. Fictional schools discussed are Sunnydale High, Greendale Community College, Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and many (seriously, many) others. No annoying tech problems this week, either! In the bonus hour, we talk about the DVD’s that will be out this Tuesday, the new direction the Batman comics are taking, and this season of True Blood so far (though largely spoiler-free, since Kevin hasn’t started the season yet, and we wanted to be all considerate-like). Enjoy!

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Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture: #10-1

Last night, Paul and I reached the conclusion of our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture. Here are choice excerpts from our top 10’s, but be sure to listen to the whole show to hear everything we said:

#10

PAUL: Calvin & Hobbes (Calvin & Hobbes)

The series was not only the funniest comic strip of all time (and on this point I will brook no dispute), but it was almost the most philosophical, satirical, and thought-provoking.

AJ: Death (The Sandman)

With the usual concepts and presentations of Death’s visage from Western culture so ingrained in my mind, just the idea that Death didn’t have to be gloomy or terrifying, and instead could be a radiant beacon of hope, felt stunningly fresh and bold to me.

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Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture: #40-31

On last night’s show, Paul and I continued our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture with #s 40-31. Be sure to listen to the show for our full run-downs, but here are some choice excerpts:

#40

PAUL: Jesse Custer (Preacher)

He’s a good ol’ Southern boy, with a hard-drinking work ethic and a code of honor that he follows to an almost fundamentalist extreme.

AJ: The Joker (DC Comics)

Though the Joker is frightening on his own, as has been explored in many comics and filmic adaptations, he would mean nothing without the Batman. He is Batman reflected through a funhouse mirror, living to terrorize and provoke Gotham City as much as Batman exists solely to protect it and keep watch over it.

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