Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 470 – “The Mighty Marvel Movie Catch-Up”

Tom Holland, Andrew Garfield, and Tobey Maguire performing a meme

Gobbledygeek episode 470, “The Mighty Marvel Movie Catch-Up,” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

And you run, you run to catch up with the sun, but it’s sinking…well, before it sets, Paul and Arlo have a few MCU movies they need to discuss. Due to that pesky pandemic, we’ve gotten behind on the Marvel Cinematic Universe here at Gobbledygeek, but fear not! In this special, super-sized episode, Paul and Arlo discuss three mighty Marvel movies: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, which brings Chinese mythology to the MCU; Eternals, which brings a race of immortal god-beings to the MCU; and Spider-Man: No Way Home, which brings a whole bunch of Spider-Men to the MCU. The boys rave about Tony Leung, have a friendly (?) debate about the merits of Eternals, can’t get enough of Andrew Garfield, and so very much more.

NEXT: he is vengeance, he is the night, he is Kenn Edwards! Everybody’s favorite podcaster/guitarist joins us for a look at Matt Reeves’ The Batman.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:01:47  –  Intro / Banter
  • 00:03:53  –  Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
  • 00:46:42  –  Eternals
  • 01:45:50  –  Spider-Man: No Way Home
  • 02:37:50  –  Outro / Next

MUSIC

  • “Time” by Pink Floyd, Dark Side of the Moon (1973)
  • “Three is a Magic Number” by Bob Dorough, Schoolhouse Rock! (1973)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Episode 139, “Iron Man Three: Iron Harder”

ironman3

Gobbledygeek episode 139, “Iron Man Three: Iron Harder,” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

Marvel once again marks the arrival of the summer movie season with the appearance of Tony Stark, this time fighting a reliance on his armor as well as a radical terrorist threat known as the Mandarin. The boys are, unfortunately, fighting each other a little on this one as well: Paul is firmly in the pro-Iron Man 3 camp, while AJ remains mixed. Is Iron Man 3 a Shane Black movie instead of a superhero movie? What position does this installment’s ballsier choices leave the character in? Is there a reason Ben Kingsley’s Mandarin voice is so fucking awful? The answers to these questions and more will be found by enduring this thing we call an episode.

Next: the moment has arrived. Paul and AJ will again torment themselves with a potentially (nay, probably) awful movie…Michael Bay’s Pain & Gain.

(Show notes for “Iron Man Three: Iron Harder.”)

Paul & AJ’s Top 10 Films of 2011

Paul and I rambled on and on about our favorites of 2011 in our second season finale, but that isn’t gonna stop us from rambling some more. This is the first in a series of top 10s that will be spread out over the next couple weeks; the rest will concern television, albums, and comic books.

But first, a word about lists. Paul has described my obsession with list-making as a “sickness,” and that’s probably close to the truth. However, even one such as I, beholden to rating and ranking everything known to man, know that these kinds of things are imperfect, to put it lightly. For one, no matter how all-inclusive you try to be, there’s always going to be a movie (or show, or comic, etc.) that you somehow missed; for example, as of this writing, neither Paul nor I have seen The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Shame, or Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, just to name a few. And more importantly, lists are always subject to how their makers feel at the moment they’re making them. Each of our top 10s represent the movies we love right now, and with the exception of our #1 choices, their order could be fluid, changing from day to day, mood to mood.

Right now, though? These are the films we adore, and which we feel exemplify 2011.

~ AJ

PAUL: 10. RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (dir. Rupert Wyatt)

The summer blockbuster that was better than any of us had any right to expect. Not only a remarkably capable relaunch/reboot of a beloved but dated franchise, but also just a damned good popcorn flick in its own right. Andy Serkis brings heart and humanity (pun intended) to the “inhuman” protagonist. It’s Pinocchio and Moses and Che Guevara.

AJ: 10. GEORGE HARRISON: LIVING IN THE MATERIAL WORLD (dir. Martin Scorsese)

It has been lazy shorthand for decades to refer to George Harrison as the “quiet Beatle,” and though that might have a kernel of truth to it, the man himself was far more complex. Publicly, he was quiet because he desperately hated fame; professionally, he was quiet during the Beatle years because John and Paul vetoed his material, and later, because he was content with tending to his family and to his garden. Martin Scorsese’s Bob Dylan documentary No Direction Home definitively captured that 60s icon’s brilliance and enigma, and while Living in the Material World doesn’t quite do the same for this 60s icon, it comes close enough. In the first part of this two-part doc, the entire life cycle of The Beatles is rehashed yet again, though considering it’s Scorsese at the helm, it remains of interest. It’s in the second part, however, when things truly come alive. By telling of his unsung career as a film producer, enticing candid stories from a number of those closest to him, and showing private home movies, Scorsese paints a portrait of Harrison as a man perpetually struggling to reconcile his spirituality with his materialism, caught between divinity and mortality.

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