Listen to Episode 198, “Show Me Your Predator Face”

predator

Gobbledygeek episode 198, “Show Me Your Predator Face,” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

After their discussion of Alien for the epic Alien/Predator podcrawl (see information on participating podcasts in the show notes), Paul and AJ now turn to John McTiernan’s 1987 sci-fi actioner Predator. Arnold Schwarzenegger stalks the jungle, joined by the likes of tough guys Carl Weathers, Jesse Ventura, and…uh…Shane Black? Sure. They in turn are stalked by a nasty dreadlock-wearing mofo with one ugly mug. Is there anything to this movie? Not really. Does there need to be? The boys are a little divided, with Paul enjoying its macho silliness and AJ doing the opposite of that. One thing they can both agree on is that there are a lot of biceps in this movie. Plus, speaking of biceps, AJ starts watching Starz’s Spartacus on frenemy Eric Sipple’s recommendation.

Next: old friend of the show/AJ’s cousin Nathan Burdette makes his triumphant return to Gobbledygeek to discuss, among other things, the new documentary Turtle Power: The Definitive History of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

(Show notes for “Show Me Your Predator Face.”)

On DVD & Blu-Ray, 6/7/11: ‘Breaking Bad,’ ‘True Grit,’ More

BREAKING BAD: The Complete Third Season (DVD/Blu-ray)

Breaking Bad‘s terrific second season was tightly plotted ahead of time, with ample foreshadowing throughout. For the show’s third season, however, creator Vince Gilligan and his writers turned into expert jazz players, improvising every note, changing rhythm, and exploring all sorts of new grooves. Gilligan and Co. repeatedly force science-teacher-turned-methmaker Walt and his junkie partner Jesse into corners there’s seemingly no way they’ll get out of; and the creative team had no idea if they could either, until they started writing the next episode. An approach like this could easily have been disastrous, but instead makes for one of the all-time great seasons of television. The jagged, frayed chemistry between Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul makes for the best duo on TV, both giving fierce performances. Stand-out episodes in a stand-out season include “One Minute,” with an intense set piece for the ages; “Fly,” which takes place entirely in the lab, examining Walt and Jesse’s relationship; and “Full Measure,” the epic season finale. Extras include commentaries by Gilligan and the cast; and a number of featurettes. 

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