Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 361 – “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (feat. Nate Curtiss)”

Gobbledygeek episode 361, “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (feat. Nate Curtiss),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Paul and Arlo swing into the Gobbledygeek season 9 finale with a discussion of the latest (and possibly greatest?) Spider-Man movie, Into the Spider-Verse. Popping in from an alternate dimension where “Curtis” has two s’s is their pal Nate Curtiss. The gang discusses how the movie nails the characterizations of Miles Morales and Peter Parker, its dazzling visuals, the film’s message of inclusion, and moviegoers’ animation biases. Plus, Paul and Arlo both make important announcements, and we discuss Miles in both the Spider-Man PS4 game and his own new comic book.

Next: if we’re legally allowed to say this, That’s all, folks! Happy holidays and we’ll see you next year for season 10!

(Show notes for “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.”)

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Last Month’s Comics: ‘Uncanny X-Men’ Ends (Until the Next Issue), ‘Spaceman’ Lifts Off

Welcome to Last Month’s Comics, in which I discuss, uh, last month’s comics. I get my comics in bi-monthly shipments from Discount Comic Book Service, and as such, I can be a little behind. So here we are.

This column is later than usual, as I was a little preoccupied earlier this month, but for all those still madly wondering about what October 2011’s comics had to offer, here we go…

BEST #1

Spaceman #1
Writer: Brian Azzarello
Art: Eduardo Risso
Publisher: Vertigo

I’ve read only a fraction of Azzarello and Risso’s acclaimed 100 Bullets, which ran for ten years from 1999 to 2009, but one needs no familiarity with their past work to be immediately sucked in by the opening chapter of Spaceman, their new nine-issue mini-series from Vertigo. It takes place in a weird, sad future, just a few monsters and flying cars away from the one in Joss Whedon’s Fray. Our protagonist is Orson, a monkey-ish man genetically engineered to travel to Mars, a trip the human race never got to make. Orson and his low-class friends speak in bizarre, disjointed slang; “okee” is how they say okay, and they actually say “LOL LOL LOL” instead of laughing. In this first issue, Orson has ominous spaceman dreams and becomes involved in the kidnapping of the adopted child of reality TV stars. Eduardo Risso’s art is terrific, Brian Azzarello’s storytelling immediately compelling. Choice line, as Orson’s alarm chirps “New day, new day, new day” while he opens the door on a bleak, cloudless future: “Why, you lyin machine…it’s the same fuck old day it always is.” (Plus: $1!)

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