Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 428 – “FCF: Prince of Cats”

Art and dialogue from Prince of Cats (2012) by Ronald Wimberly

Gobbledygeek episode 428, “FCF: Prince of Cats,” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

Two hosts, unalike in dignity, in fair Gobbledygeek, where we set our podcast. For this month’s Four-Color Flashback, Paul and Arlo pull out a boombox blasting Romeo and Juliet side B. In Prince of Cats, Ronald Wimberly passes the mic to Juliet’s cousin Tybalt, a sideways entry point into the events that lead to and inform the soapy classic. Oh, and did we mention this version stars a Black cast living in an ‘80s NYC where everybody participates in an underground samurai swordfighting ring? The boys discuss Wimberly’s ingenious distortion of Shakespearean language; his manga-influenced art; how the book enriches (perhaps even improves upon?) the play; and what it means to tell this story from a race-conscious perspective.

NEXT: oh hey, it’s that Christopher Plummer Geek Challenge we promised. Mike Nichols’ Wolf and Michael Mann’s The Insider go head-to-head.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:48  –  Intro / Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet
  • 00:23:00  –  Prince of Cats
  • 01:03:45  –  (Interlude: Paul reads NSFW Shakespearean dialogue from Prince of Cats)
  • 01:55:08  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Step Off” by Grandmaster Melle-Mel & The Furious Five (1984)
  • “Sucker M.C.’s” by Run-DMC, Run-DMC (1983)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 427 – “Derek DelGaudio’s In & Of Itself (feat. Wesley Mead)”

Derek DelGaudio in In & Of Itself (2020), directed by Frank Oz

Gobbledygeek episode 427, “Derek DelGaudio’s In & Of Itself (feat. Wesley Mead),” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

I am a podcast. This week, Paul and Arlo are joined by Wesley Mead to unravel the mystery of Derek DelGaudio’s stage show In & Of Itself, now available on Hulu in a filmed version directed by none other than Frank Oz. Truth be told, if truth is a concept you believe in, the gang doesn’t do much unraveling. No, that would be beyond the point. Instead, they discuss how the show makes them feel and what it reveals about the relationship between one human being and another. Magic, wolves, self-identity, and the communal experience all make an appearance. Plus, Wezzo tells us how the UK is faring with lockdown, and Arlo raves about Merawi Gerima’s stunning feature debut Residue.

NEXT: I’ll meet you in another life, when we are both cats. This month’s Four-Color Flashback is all about Ronald Wimberly’s take on Romeo and Juliet, 2012’s Prince of Cats.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:55  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:23:37  –  Derek DelGaudio’s In & Of Itself
  • 01:52:12  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Dog and Wolf” by Green Dolphin Street, Boozekilla (2017)
  • “I Am” by AWOLNATION, Run (2015)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 426 – “Geek Challenge: Hawk the Slayer vs. The Adventures of Robin Hood”

Top: Bernard Bresslaw, John Terry, Patricia Quinn, Ray Charleson, and W. Morgan Sheppard in Hawk the Slayer (1980), directed by Terry Marcel / Bottom: Herbert Mundin, Errol Flynn, and Alan Hale, Sr. in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), directed by Michael Curtiz

Gobbledygeek episode 426, “Geek Challenge: Hawk the Slayer vs. The Adventures of Robin Hood,” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

Ah, merry old England. A land of many fine tales as well as some pretty crummy ones. This week, Paul and Arlo explore both sides of English mythmaking in a Geek Challenge that hearkens back to the Middle Ages; i.e., the 1930s and 1980s. First up is a movie Paul has been trying to get Arlo to watch literally as long as they’ve been podcasting: Terry Marcel’s 1980 sword-and-sorcery epic (?) Hawk the Slayer, featuring John Terry and Jack Palance as improbable brothers warring over the power of the Mind Sword. In return, Arlo has Paul watch Michael Curtiz’s 1938 classic The Adventures of Robin Hood, starring Errol Flynn as the screen’s most iconic Robin. The boys discuss Hawk as Paul’s Rosetta stone; Robin Hood as one of those movies you just sort of absorb by osmosis; gloriously cheesy synth scores; Daffy Duck becoming a friar; and more. Plus, Jonathan Hickman’s X-Men!

NEXT: to celebrate the career of the late, great Christopher Plummer, we’re doing another Geek Challenge featuring Wolf and The Insider.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:30  –  Fade In / Intro
  • 00:06:34  –  Hawk the Slayer
  • 00:52:10  –  The Adventures of Robin Hood
  • 01:24:37  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Hawk the Slayer” by Harry Robertson, Hawk the Slayer (Original Soundtrack) (1980)
  • “Duel, Victory and Epilogue” by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 425 – “evermore (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

Taylor Swift in the music video for ‘willow’ (2020), directed by herself

Gobbledygeek episode 425, “evermore (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

‘Tis the damn season. Last summer, we convened the Three Heathens–Paul, Arlo, and A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis–to discuss Taylor Swift’s first surprise album of 2020, Folklore. It was surprising not only for the nature of its release but for the folk pop/singer-songwriter shift it marked, becoming the finest achievement of Swift’s career. On her second surprise album of 2020, Evermore, she may have equaled that achievement. The Heathens are back to discuss the progression of Swift’s Joni Mitchell phase, as her lyrics become more reflective and complex. They’re strengthened by producer/co-writer Aaron Dessner’s sonic palette, introducing new sounds to Swift’s oeuvre. It’s true, the boys go a little off the rails into Lynch references, but one thing is undeniable: the more we say, the less you know. Plus, a discussion of the Disney+ making-of/concert film Folklore: The Long Pond Studio Sessions.

NEXT: it’s Hawk the Slayer vs. The Adventures of Robin Hood in a Geek Challenge.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:37  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:03:40  –  Folklore: The Long Pond Studio Sessions
  • 00:16:47  –  Evermore
  • 02:36:36  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Willow” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)
  • “Champagne Problems” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)
  • “‘Tis the Damn Season” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)
  • “Should’ve Said No” by Taylor Swift, Taylor Swift (2008)
  • “No Body, No Crime (feat. HAIM)” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)
  • “No Body, No Crime (The No Hugo, No Stiglitz Remix)” by Joe Lewis
  • “Coney Island (feat. The National)” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)
  • “Ivy” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)
  • “Cowboy Like Me” by Taylor Swift, evermore (2020)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to the Gobbledygeek Season 12 Premiere – “Who’s Your Daddy?”

The Gobbledygeek season 12 premiere, “Who’s Your Daddy?,” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

First comes a podcast, then comes 423 more podcasts, then comes a baby who is doomed to think having a podcast host for a dad is normal. On the Gobbledygeek season 12 premiere, Arlo is revealed to be a babydaddy–and the kid isn’t Paul’s! Scandal! Arlo discusses life as the father of a newborn, which involves a good deal of poop. Paul has also had to deal with a good deal of poop, even though his isn’t issuing forth from a screaming, squealing bundle of joy. In between all the poop talk, the boys squeeze out some pop culture talk: Arlo catches up with the new seasons of Ramy and PEN15; Paul gets TikTok’d; Arlo watches (and reads) You; and the boys commiserate about the bizarre, disappointing Wonder Woman 1984.

NEXT: ‘tis the damn season. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis returns to the show for another round of Swiftie analysis with a deep-dive into Evermore.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:01:07  –  Intro
  • 01:24:30  –  Spoilers for Netflix’s You (and the novels it’s based on)
  • 01:29:20  –  End spoilers
  • 01:55:05  –  Outro / Next

MUSIC

  • “Isn’t She Lovely” by Stevie Wonder, Songs in the Key of Life (1976)
  • “Wellerman” by Nathan Evans (2021)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to the Gobbledygeek Season 11 Finale – “Geek Challenge: Thunderheart vs. Dead Man”

Top: Graham Greene and Val Kilmer in Thunderheart (1992), directed by Michael Apted / Bottom: Johnny Depp and Gary Farmer in Dead Man (1995), directed by Jim Jarmusch

Gobbledygeek episode 423, “Geek Challenge: Thunderheart vs. Dead Man,” is available for listening or download right here and on Apple Podcasts here.

Because our mascot is a turkey, and because we generally frown upon genocide, Paul and Arlo are spending Thanksgiving weekend discussing films with ties to Native American culture. For this Geek Challenge, Paul urges Arlo to watch Michael Apted’s 1992 conspiracy thriller Thunderheart, starring Val Kilmer as an FBI agent who grows to embrace his Sioux heritage. In turn, Arlo makes Paul watch Jim Jarmusch’s 1995 psychedelic Western Dead Man, wherein Johnny Depp’s iteration of William Blake takes an offbeat journey to the next life. The boys address the major caveat of both films starring white men, as well as their own lily whiteness; determine that Graham Greene and Gary Farmer walk away with their respective movies; and discuss how both films explore spiritual death and rebirth. With a bonus discussion of Apted’s documentary Incident at Oglala!

NEXT: Arlo’s having a baby. We’re going on hiatus with hopes of returning in mid-to-late January. We wish everyone a happy and, more importantly, safe holiday season. We love you.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:01:00  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:07:15  –  Thunderheart
  • 01:08:16  –  Dead Man
  • 02:09:36  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Grafitti Man” by John Trudell, A.K.A. Grafitti Man (1986)
  • “NDN Kars” by Keith Secola, Circle (1992)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 420 – “Gobbledyween: Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

Billy Zane and Jada Pinkett Smith in Ernest R. Dickerson’s ‘Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight’ (1995)

Gobbledygeek episode 420, “Gobbledyween: Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on Apple Podcasts here.

Hello, kiddies. Are you ready for your deadtime story? Gobbledyween 2020 comes to a close as A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins Paul and Arlo in the Cryptkeeper’s lair to discuss Ernest R. Dickerson’s 1995 frightfest Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight. These hodunk, podunk, well-then-there motherfuckers discuss the insane cast, including William Sadler, Billy Zane, Dick Miller, and CCH Pounder; the importance of Jada Pinkett Smith’s heroine Jeryline; Dickerson’s use of light and color; and why this is the perfect mid-’90s time capsule.

NEXT: VOTE.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:50  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:09:08  –  Demon Knight
  • 01:47:19  –  Outro / VOTE!!! / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Tales from the Crypt” by Danny Elfman, Original Music from Tales from the Crypt (1992)
  • “Hey Man Nice Shot” by Filter, Short Bus (1995)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 419 – “Gobbledyween: Twin Peaks – Fire Walk With Me (feat. Katie L. Wright)”

Sheryl Lee in David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me’ (1992)

Gobbledygeek episode 419, “Gobbledyween: Twin Peaks – Fire Walk With Me (feat. Katie L. Wright),” is available for listening or download right here and on Apple Podcasts here.

This week, we want all our garmonbozia. Gobbledyween 2020 emerges from the Black Lodge as Bret Easton Hell Yes host Katie L. Wright joins Paul and Arlo to discuss David Lynch’s divisive Twin Peaks prequel/sequel, 1992’s Fire Walk With Me. The gang discusses the film’s polarizing reception at Cannes (Tarantino hated it!), the surprising empathy Lynch and co-writer Robert Engels show toward both victims and perpetrators of sexual abuse, how Fire Walk With Me is the lynchpin (get it?) of the Twin Peaks universe, and of course, Sheryl Lee’s incredible performance as Laura Palmer.

NEXT: Gobbledyween comes to a close as original Gobbler Joseph Lewis hams it up with the Cryptkeeper for Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:01:07  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:03:10  –  Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me
  • 01:40:05  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “A Real Indication” by Angelo Badalementi, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) (1992)
  • “The Pink Room” by Angelo Badalementi, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) (1992)
  • “Questions In a World of Blue” by Angelo Badalementi, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) (1992)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 418 – “Gobbledyween: Tremors (feat. Jason Tabrys)”

Fred Ward and Kevin Bacon, masquerading as Paul and Arlo, in Ron Underwood’s ‘Tremors’ (1990).

Gobbledygeek episode 418, “Gobbledyween: Tremors (feat. Jason Tabrys),” is available for listening or download right here and on Apple Podcasts here.

Perfection, NV, pop. 14, is adding three more country bumpkins to its census: Paul, Arlo, and Jason Tabrys, writer for Uproxx and Den of Geek, who is returning to the show after a stunning two-year absence. The gang is here to continue the month-long horror celebration Gobbledyween by discussing Ron Underwood’s 1990 creature feature Tremors. There is discussion of Kevin Bacon’s small head, Burt Gummer’s voting record, the simple efficacy of S.S. Wilson and Brent Maddock’s script, why the Graboids are great movie monsters, and more. Long-time listeners will know that when Jason Tabrys is involved, more means more.

NEXT: we want all our garmonbozia. Jessica Shipp joins us to discuss Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:28  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:06:00  –  Tremors
  • 01:33:40  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Good Vibrations” by The Beach Boys, Smiley Smile (1967)
  • “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” by Jerry Lee Lewis, Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On (Single) (1957)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 417 – “Gobbledyween: The Autopsy of Jane Doe (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Brian Cox, Olwen Kelly, and Emile Hirsch in André Øvredal’s ‘The Autopsy of Jane Doe’ (2016).

Gobbledygeek episode 417, “Gobbledyween: The Autopsy of Jane Doe (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on Apple Podcasts here.

Leaves are on the ground. Blood is on the screen. It’s time for Gobbledyween.

Take a break from the horror of the real world to join Paul and Arlo for that most venerated of Gobbledygeek traditions, the month-long horror movie marathon known as Gobbledyween. To kick things off for 2020, our pal Greg Sahadachny takes a break from the usual goofy stuff we stick him with (like the very goofy The Stuff) to go legit with his own personal selection: André Øvredal’s 2016 procedural chiller The Autopsy of Jane Doe. The gang takes a scalpel to the film, discussing how Øvredal gets the most out of his “bottle episode” morgue setting; Brian Cox and Emile Hirsch’s strong performances as a father-son coroner duo; how the film avoids fetishizing Olwen Kelly’s nude body; and why nihilism in horror films can feel so satisfying.

NEXT: grab(oid) onto your butts, Uproxx editor Jason Tabrys joins us to talk Tremors.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:50  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:08:00  –  The Autopsy of Jane Doe
  • 01:26:06  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Open Up Your Heart (and Let the Sunshine In)” by Frente!, Saturday Morning Cartoons’ Greatest Hits (1995)
  • “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures) [From the American Tribal Love Rock Musical “Hair”]” by The 5th Dimension, The Age of Aquarius (1969)