Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 434 – “The Shorter Stick Up Arlo’s [Bleep]”

Kurt Russell in Escape from New York (1981), directed by John Carpenter

Gobbledygeek episode 434, “The Shorter Stick Up Arlo’s [Bleep],” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

This is a freestyle episode, so you better believe Paul and Arlo talk about all manner of goofy shit, but–there’s also kind of a topic too? Look, we make this stuff up as we go along, get that look off your face. Arlo watched John Carpenter’s 1981 cult classic Escape from New York for the very first time, and he absolutely loved it. He and Paul rave about the movie, its highly relatable cynicism, and its amazing music…which leads Arlo to proffer a shocking apology. The stick up his ass, it’s gotten a little shorter over the years. Plus, an in-depth breakdown of This Is Us’ timeline and an exploration of why roasts suck. Sponsored by the adult toy purveyor of your choice!

NEXT: indie filmmaker Austin Allan James joins us to discuss his debut feature, Who’s With Me?

MUSIC

  • “Escape from New York (Main Title)” by John Carpenter, Escape from New York (Original Film Soundtrack) (1981)
  • “Bandstand Boogie” by Les Elgart (1954)

GOBBLEDYCARES

On DVD & Blu-Ray, 7/5/11: ‘Hobo with a Shotgun,’ ‘Das Boot,’ More

HOBO WITH A SHOTGUN (DVD/Two-Disc Collector’s Edition DVD/Collector’s Edition Blu-ray & Digital)

Hobo with a Shotgun is the feature-length adaptation of a contest-winning faux trailer shown with some Canadian prints of 2007’s Grindhouse; I haven’t seen the trailer, but maybe this stuff was amusing at two-and-a-half minutes. At 86 minutes, it is grim, nasty, and joyless. In aping the sleazoid vigilante flicks of the 70’s, I’m sure that was the intent of director/co-writer Jason Eisener. But that doesn’t mean I have to like it. Look, Planet Terror is great because it’s a well-crafted, old school adrenaline-pumper; Death Proof is great because it subverts grindhouse tropes while still managing to celebrate them. Both of them have  moments of shocking violence, but they’re both clearly heartfelt love letters to the movies of Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino’s childhoods. Hobo with a Shotgun feels like their obnoxious little shit of a brother who’s trying to outdo them at every turn, in effect making himself look all the more pathetic. There’s not much fun here. What there is, is a lot of sadism and stupidity. If that’s your thing, by all means, but I’ll be slowly backing away now. Extras on the Collector’s Edition (because apparently making less than $1 million at the box office warranted such a thing) include a making-of doc; a behind-the-scenes interactive mode; an alternate ending; deleted scenes; vlogs; an HDNet featurette; the original trailer; TV spots; theatrical trailers; commentary with Eisener and star Rutger Hauer; and another commentary with Eisener, producer Rob Cotteril, co-writer John Davies, and original hobo David Brunt. 

(Originally reviewed by me in “Wow.”)

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