Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ 356, “Gobbledyween: Creepshow (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Gobbledygeek episode 356, “Gobbledyween: Creepshow (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Gobbledyween returns! Again! Greg Sahadachny, once and future host of The Debatable Podcast, returns! Again! To close out our truncated season of horror happenings, Paul, Arlo, and Greg flip ahead to George A. Romero and Stephen King’s kooky 1982 splash page Creepshow. Indebted to old EC horror comics, Creepshow has become a cult classic in its own right, as silly and lowbrow as it is reverent and artful. The gang discusses why the meeting of these two horror masters may not be what you would expect; the underrated craft of Romero’s filmmaking; how tough it is to view Leslie Nielsen as anything other than the Naked Gun guy these days; and Ted Danson’s head in a tank. Plus, Paul travels to the fantastical world of Hilda; Arlo checks into The Haunting of Hill House; and forgive us, Carpenter, for we have synth-ed.

Next: the show blows up.

(Show notes for “Gobbledyween: Creepshow.”)

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Stephen King May Pen an Episode of ‘The Walking Dead’

The Walking Dead: great pilot, good show, could be better. And if you want your horror series to get better, who do you sign on to write an episode? Stephen King, of course. We here at Gobbledygeek (at least the half that’s me) are huge fans of King, and think this news couldn’t be much better. King isn’t officially confirmed to be writing an episode, but he’s currently in talks, and says that executive producer Frank Darabont is enthusiastic to get him onboard either next season or the season after. King and Darabont go way back–all the way back to Darabont’s 1983 short film The Woman in the Room, but also The Shawshank RedemptionThe Green Mile, and The Mist. King would be making his contribution a family affair as well, co-writing an episode with his son, the popular horror novelist Joe Hill.

As an aside, I was going to review King’s latest book, the novella collection Full Dark, No Stars, on our most recent episode, but that episode was already way too long for me to start babbling about literature, because what the hell do I know about literature. Anyways: check it out, it’s pretty good! Especially brutal opener “1922,” about a farmer who kills his wife; and fascinating closer “A Good Marriage,” in which a woman finds out her husband has been hiding a pretty dark secret.

In summary, two Kings + Darabont + The Walking Dead = our utmost anticipation.