Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 419 – “Gobbledyween: Twin Peaks – Fire Walk With Me (feat. Katie L. Wright)”

Sheryl Lee in David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me’ (1992)

Gobbledygeek episode 419, “Gobbledyween: Twin Peaks – Fire Walk With Me (feat. Katie L. Wright),” is available for listening or download right here and on Apple Podcasts here.

This week, we want all our garmonbozia. Gobbledyween 2020 emerges from the Black Lodge as Bret Easton Hell Yes host Katie L. Wright joins Paul and Arlo to discuss David Lynch’s divisive Twin Peaks prequel/sequel, 1992’s Fire Walk With Me. The gang discusses the film’s polarizing reception at Cannes (Tarantino hated it!), the surprising empathy Lynch and co-writer Robert Engels show toward both victims and perpetrators of sexual abuse, how Fire Walk With Me is the lynchpin (get it?) of the Twin Peaks universe, and of course, Sheryl Lee’s incredible performance as Laura Palmer.

NEXT: Gobbledyween comes to a close as original Gobbler Joseph Lewis hams it up with the Cryptkeeper for Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:01:07  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:03:10  –  Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me
  • 01:40:05  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “A Real Indication” by Angelo Badalementi, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) (1992)
  • “The Pink Room” by Angelo Badalementi, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) (1992)
  • “Questions In a World of Blue” by Angelo Badalementi, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture) (1992)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture: #40-31

On last night’s show, Paul and I continued our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture with #s 40-31. Be sure to listen to the show for our full run-downs, but here are some choice excerpts:

#40

PAUL: Jesse Custer (Preacher)

He’s a good ol’ Southern boy, with a hard-drinking work ethic and a code of honor that he follows to an almost fundamentalist extreme.

AJ: The Joker (DC Comics)

Though the Joker is frightening on his own, as has been explored in many comics and filmic adaptations, he would mean nothing without the Batman. He is Batman reflected through a funhouse mirror, living to terrorize and provoke Gotham City as much as Batman exists solely to protect it and keep watch over it.

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