Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 235, “All Together Now (feat. Eric Sipple)”

sense8

Gobbledygeek episode 235, “All Together Now (feat. Eric Sipple),” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

If you ever feel like you’ve got more than one voice in your head…you just might. That’s what the eight leads of Netflix’s new series Sense8 discover. What Paul and AJ discover, along with their The Deli Counter of Justice co-editor Eric Sipple, is that the show, from the minds of the Wachowski siblings and J. Michael Straczynski, is a fascinating intersection of race, class, sexuality, and geography. As the characters experience the world through each others’ eyes–and beyond–the show delves into a topic unfamiliar to much pop culture: empathy. The gang digs into Sense8‘s metaphysical kick, its brilliantly layered characters, its binge-watching model, and more.

Next: Greg Sahadachny of The Debatable Podcast drops in for another Four-Color Flashback episode examining Jeff Smith’s Bone. This time, we’ll be reading Bone: Vol IV – The Dragonslayer.

(Show notes for “All Together Now.”)

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Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 216, “The Martian: Part 2 – Signal Acquired (feat. Hallie Prime)”

martian2

Gobbledygeek episode 216, “The Martian: Part 2 – Signal Acquired (feat. Hallie Prime),” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

For the second week of Gobbledy-Book Club 2015, Paul and AJ are joined by longtime friend (but first-time guest) Hallie Prime to discuss chapters 7-12 of The Martian by Andy Weir. As stranded astronaut Mark Watney becomes more and more desperate for human contact, Weir begins to tap into the emotional weight of his premise. The gang debates how effective this is…and continues to have issues with a little thing called “dialogue.” Plus, AJ prepares to Better Call Saul, while the gang straps on their gravity boots for the Wachowskis’ Jupiter Ascending.

Next: Wanna Cook? author Ensley F. Guffey stops by to talk chapters 13-19 of The Martian.

(Show notes for “The Martian: Part 2 – Signal Acquired.”)

Paul & AJ’s Top 10 Films of 2012

Last week, we discussed our favorite TV series of the last year. This week, we turn to the big screen.

PAUL: 10. DJANGO UNCHAINED (dir. Quentin Tarantino)

Jamie Foxx in 'Django Unchained'

With Django Unchained, director Quentin Tarantino takes us once more back to a terrible moment in our history, and once again asks us to indulge him his little anachronisms and revisionist revenge fantasies. This time, instead of Nazis and baseball-bat-wielding Jews, we get slavers and bounty-hunting dentists. Set in the pre-Civil War Deep South, Unchained is Tarantino’s homage to the Spaghetti Westerns of Leone and Corbucci, which he prefers to call his Spaghetti Southern. I’ll say that the absence of editor Sally Menke is sharply felt here, though. If I, of all people, notice the nearly three-hour runtime, then there could’ve been some tightening. The cast is great across the board, including a list of hidden cameos longer than my arm (among others, original Django Franco Nero makes an appearance). Jamie Foxx is great in the title role, though I imagine what Will Smith could’ve done with the part, as was the original intent. Leo DiCaprio, Samuel L. Jackson, and Walton Goggins all shine in their respective roles. Kerry Washington was reduced to little more than the damsel in distress, however, which is unusual for a Tarantino picture. But the standout here is Christoph Waltz. He is every bit as charmingly heroic and admirable this time as he was charmingly repulsive and hateful in Basterds.

AJ: 10. MOONRISE KINGDOM (dir. Wes Anderson)

Kara Hayward and Jared Gilman in 'Moonrise Kingdom'

Wes Anderson’s films often have a childlike quality about them, whether it be his colorful storybook compositions or the petulance of many of his characters. So it’s fitting that he’s finally made a film about children, one in which the kids are on the run from what’s expected of them and their adult guardians are forced to accept the roles they’ve played in their children’s abandonment of them. Newcomers Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward, both in their first screen acting roles, give perfectly awkward performances. Anderson regulars Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman are in their element here, while Frances McDormand and Tilda Swinton join the auteur’s troupe with ease. Perhaps most encouragingly, Moonrise Kingdom is the first sign of life in years from Bruce Willis–who, with a movie soon to appear on our lists, proved later in the year that he’s most definitely still kicking–and Edward Norton, two actors who really needed a movie like this.

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Listen to Episode 120, “This Much is True-True”

Gobbledygeek episode 120, “This Much is True-True,” is available for listening or download right here.

Gobbledygeek is no stranger to generations-spanning epics; the whole show has been an experimental piece showing how different pop culture artifacts complement and dovetail with one another, and of how the love of two co-hosts will endure for the rest of history. Haha, just kidding, we’re just a dumb podcast, but this week we are talking about something that is certainly not dumb and is most definitely ambitious: Tom Tykwer and Andy & Lana Wachowski’s Cloud Atlas. Paul and AJ are both fans of the film and describe why it works for them and how emotional it made them, while also discussing the whole “yellowface” controversy. Plus, there was this whole big election thing that happened. They talk about that.

Next: It’s the third annual Gobbledygeek Thanksgiving! This time, instead of actually talking to other human beings, we will be most thankful for the Thankskilling duology.

(Show notes for “This Much is True-True.”)