Listen to Episode 101, “What Does God Need with a Starship?”

Gobbledygeek episode 101, “What Does God Need with a Starship?,” is available for listening or download right here.

Ridley Scott’s Prometheus opened earlier this month and has generated some nerd controversy with its Alien overtones, questionable character motivations, and general ambiguity. Paul and AJ discuss everything they liked about the film (it’s gorgeous!), everything they didn’t (“Yes…father“), and Paul contemplates as many of the film’s big questions as he can before AJ loses interest. Plus, the boys discuss the other Alien films, read an e-mail, and actually get asked a Formspring question for the first time in like a century.

Next: something to do with music. We’d like to say we’re just playing coy, but we honestly have no idea.

(Show notes for “What Does God Need with a Starship?”)

‘Prometheus’ Review: Lost in Space

Ridley Scott’s Prometheus has an early shot which undeniably quotes 2001: A Space Odyssey, a beautiful image of a planet ringed with light. There’s some more striking imagery, of an unidentified landscape. A humanoid being removes his cloak and ingests some form of liquid which quickly begins killing him. He sacrificially gives himself to the river, where he falls apart piece by piece, his body possibly giving birth to life as we know it. That’s a provocative beginning for a big-budget science fiction film, one that clearly announces its intentions to be a thoughtful exploration of the creation and destruction of life. As they say, the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

After the cryptic prologue, things get off to a very good start. The crew of the good ship Prometheus–which looks like a jumbo Serenity, but maybe that’s just me–is awakened from cryogenic sleep after two years by the android David (Michael Fassbender). Scientists Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace) and Charlie Holloway (Logan Marshall-Green) have discovered cave paintings from around the world, all of which depict images of a figure gesturing toward the same star pattern. They’ve followed that pattern all the way out to the middle of space, hoping to find the meaning of life, the universe, and everything. There are some big ideas at play here, and in the early going, there are conversations about whether the existence of supposed humanity-creating beings (Engineers, they’re called) negates or supports the existence of God. Holloway posits that because they now know the Engineers exist, the cross Shaw wears around her neck is meaningless. Shaw, with a wink in her eye, then asks where the Engineers came from.

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