Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 296, “Swing Away (feat. Kenn Edwards)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 296, “Swing Away (feat. Kenn Edwards),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Armed only with a glass of water and his trusty baseball bat, Kenn Edwards of So Let’s Get to the Point invades the podcast this week to help Paul and Arlo kick off Gobbledyween 2016. This year’s month-long horror-fest gets off to a miraculous start with a discussion of M. Night Shyamalan’s sci-fi thriller Signs. After the runaway success of The Sixth Sense and the lukewarm contemporary response to Unbreakable, Signs is often considered the last film Shyamalan made before a precipitous decline; that is, when it’s considered at all. The gang gets to the core of what makes Signs a worthwhile film, including a question you may hear repeated about the other movies on this year’s slate: Is it a horror film at all? The boys also delve into Shyamalan’s exploration of faith, how the film functions as a response to 9/11, whether or not it’s okay to still enjoy a Mel Gibson performance, and more. Plus, Paul violently shames Arlo for not watching Luke Cage, and the mythical episode 300 is teased.

Next: Gobbledyween 2016 grows fangs for Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampiric neo-Western Near Dark.

(Show notes for “Swing Away.”)

Listen to ‘The Avatar Returns’ Episode 29

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The Avatar Returns episode 29 is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

M. Night Shyamalan directed a movie. Arlo made us watch it. We didn’t like it. We talk about it. We’re sorry.

(Ed. note: we experience intermittent audio issues throughout recording, because even the universe didn’t want us to discuss this garbage fire of a film.)

Next: we finally get back to The Legend of Korra as we kick off Book Two: Spirits with chapters 201-204, “Rebel Spirit,” “The Southern Lights,” “Civil Wars, Part 1,” and “Civil Wars, Part 2.”

(Show notes for The Avatar Returns episode 29.)

Four-Color Flashback: Chris Claremont & John Byrne’s ‘Uncanny X-Men’ #129-135

Welcome to week 4 of 5 in our analysis of Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s run on Uncanny X-Men. Weeks 1, 2, and 3 can be found here, here, and here.

Well.

This is not quite the reaction I was expecting. They’d fought Magneto, endured the Savage Land, tussled with Arcade and Proteus, and now the X-Men were preparing to go up against possibly their biggest threats yet, the Hellfire Club and Dark Phoenix. And yet I’m sitting here, after these seven issues, with a slight pang of disappointment. There are a number of things I could blame this disappointment on. First and foremost, as you may have noticed by the delayed episode this week, these last few days at Gobbledygeek HQ have been a mite rough. You’re also probably reading this column at least a day late. I don’t regard anything about this column as a chore–it was my idea, and there’s no money involved–but all the same, when you know you have something to do and not much time in which to do it, it can seem like a chore. Which I fully admit is not the best frame of mind to approach a work of art, be it a comic book, a movie, an album, what have you.

But the only reason I bring that up is because I don’t really want to consider the alternative: that for the first time during their run, and ramping up to the most iconic storyline of their joint tenure, Claremont and Byrne have stumbled. Nothing huge or damaging, but instead of continuing their ascent, a little fumbling of the ball. There are parts of these issues that are as epic as they should be, but something feels a little off.

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