Listen to a Very Special ‘Gobbledygeek,’ “The Wiley Wedding Aural Experience (feat. Everyone)”

This bonus episode of Gobbledygeek, “The Wiley Wedding Aural Experience (feat. Everyone),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Everyone loves aural after a wedding. An aural document of said wedding, that is! That’s right, Arlo and Amber tied the knot, and Paul was on hand to witness the entire drunken event. So were Joseph Lewis, completing the Three Heathens reunion; Kenn Edwards, whose new EP rules; longtime friend of the show but first-time guest Darryl James, who challenges Arlo to a Buffy trivia quiz; and newbie Gabe Hochstetler, who finds himself the sole positive voice during a brief review of Solo: A Star Wars Story. Video game bars, shots, impolite tailors, shots, poorly choreographed “Gangnam Style” dances, shots, impromptu mowing, and oh yeah, shots. It was a wild ride, and you are formally invited.

Next: let your magical umbrella take you to Romania for a musical Geek Challenge featuring Mary Poppins and The Lure.

(Show notes for “The Wiley Wedding Aural Experience.”)

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Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 342, “Captain America and the Falcon: Secret Empire (feat. Ensley F. Guffey)”

Gobbledygeek episode 342, “Captain America and the Falcon: Secret Empire (feat. Ensley F. Guffey),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

An American feels betrayed by his government, which has revealed itself to be nothing but a bureaucratic system designed to conceal criminal activity. Sounds familiar, right? It’s also the basis for the superhero classic Captain America and the Falcon: Secret Empire. Steve Englehart, Mike Friedrich, and Sal Buscema’s Nixon-era tale finds Cap on the run from a populace that no longer trusts him. Joining Paul and Arlo for this Four-Color Flashback installment is Wanna Cook? author and Cap superfan Ensley F. Guffey. The gang discusses why a story like this couldn’t be told today, how it’s difficult to understand Watergate’s importance given today’s political climate, the uncomfortable jive-talkin’ racial stereotypes, and why the outrageous cornball of old superhero comics doesn’t dilute its power. Plus, Arlo makes an apology and the gang shares what comics they’ve been reading.

Next: it’s all been leading to this. Avengers: Infinity War.

(Show notes for “Captain America and the Falcon: Secret Empire.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 317, “Baby Driver: Who Doesn’t Like Hats?”

Gobbledygeek episode 317, “Baby Driver: Who Doesn’t Like Hats?”, is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

This week, Paul and Arlo put the pedal to the metal and drop the needle on Baby Driver, the latest nerd fantasia from writer-director Edgar Wright. Filled with rock and soul classics, Wright’s first American film is a high-concept car chase musical that nevertheless plays things a little straighter than his British/Canadian ventures. The boys discuss their favorite music cues, whether or not the internet is right to hate Ansel Elgort, what the film says about music as the soundtrack to our lives, and of course the goddamn Hamm. Plus, Paul and Arlo puzzle over the latest season of Orange Is the New Black and take a bite out of Bong Joon-ho’s Okja.

Next: first-time guest Heather Wiley swings by to talk Spider-Man: Homecoming.

(Show notes for “Baby Driver: Who Doesn’t Like Hats?”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 312, “Y: The Last Man – Vol. 5: Ring of Truth”

Art from ‘Y: The Last Man – Vol. 5: Ring of Truth’ by Pia Guerra, Jose Marzan Jr., and Zylonol.

Gobbledygeek episode 312, “Y: The Last Man – Vol. 5: Ring of Truth,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Y: The Last Man gets its very own Ring Cycle with Vol. 5: Ring of Truth, wherein Yorick is separated from his engagement ring while the Culper Ring goes head-to-head with the Setauket Ring. Meanwhile, Paul and Arlo’s year-long Four-Color Flashback “study” of Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra’s acclaimed series runs rings around the competition (not that there is any). The boys discuss everyone’s relative morality; the stand-alone issue “Hero’s Journey,” which allows us to see things from a feminine perspective; whether or not it all comes down to crane spunk and monkey shit; and Christ on a cross. Plus, Paul and Arlo remember Chris Cornell.

Next: killer trees are afoot as Wesley “Wezzo” Mead joins the boys once again to discuss Chris Carter’s seminal sci-fi series The X-Files. This time, the gang sets their sights on season 5 and the series’ first big screen outing, Fight the Future.

(Show notes for “Y: The Last Man – Vol. 5: Ring of Truth.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 304, “Oh Hi, Superman”

Gobbledygeek episode 304, “Oh Hi, Superman,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

If only these walls could talk, the secrets they could tell. Among them: murder, betrayal, lies, infidelity, and how in the hell Tommy Wiseau made a movie. It’s time for another Geek Challenge, and Arlo has seized the opportunity to finally force Paul into watching Wiseau’s 2003 cult classic The Room. In turn, Paul has challenged Arlo to Sidney Lumet’s much more dignified 1982 crime comedy Deathtrap. The boys discuss the advantages of stage over screen, and vice versa; questionable acting, be it Dyan Cannon or Greg Sestero; homoerotic subtext (or maybe it’s just text); and, yet again, Arlo’s fascination with epically bad filmmaking. Plus, Paul got his ears blown out by the Alabama Symphony’s Led Zeppelin performance.

Next: Kenn Edwards joins Paul and Arlo for the next installment of their year-long Four-Color Flashback discussion of Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra’s Y: The Last Man. This time, the gang will talk Vol. 3: One Small Step.

(Show notes for “Oh Hi, Superman.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 290, “If You Must Blink, Do It Now”

kubo

Gobbledygeek episode 290, “If You Must Blink, Do It Now,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Laika, the studio behind Coraline, ParaNorman, and The Boxtrolls, has gifted us with a new film: Kubo and the Two Strings, wherein a young one-eyed Japanese boy plays his magical shamisen and pals around with a Monkey and a Beetle while evading the evil grandfather looking to steal his other eye. As one does. Paul and Arlo get in tune with Kubo, digging into the film’s symbolism, its unusual (for a mainstream animated film) themes of grief and impermanence, and how it perfects the nearly dead artform that is stop-motion animation. Is it suitable for kids? What does its underwhelming box office performance say about what audiences expect from animated films? And what does that polarizing ending mean? All this and more, plus Arlo saw an actual Beatle.

Next: for another great story that deserves a wider audience, Paul and Arlo continue their year-long Four-Color Flashback exploration of Matt Wagner’s Grendel with “God and the Devil, Part 1,” collected in Grendel Omnibus: Vol. 3, pp. 115-270.

(Show notes for “If You Must Blink, Do It Now.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 284, “Motorcycle Ninjas on the Forbidden Planet”

forbiddenconnection

Gobbledygeek episode 284, “Motorcycle Ninjas on the Forbidden Planet,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The Geek Challenge. It’s a time-honored tradition: Paul makes Arlo watch some silly ’80s cheesefest, Arlo subjects Paul to a stuffy revered classic. Everyone loses. In the interest of restoring some spontaneity to this well-worn custom, this time Arlo forces upon Paul perhaps the cheesiest movie of the ’80s, Y.K. Kim’s 1987 cult “classic” Miami Connection, in which a group of power balladeers do battle with cocaine ninjas; while Paul finally makes Arlo watch 1956’s Forbidden Planet, a retro-futuristic take on Shakespeare’s The Tempest and a legitimate classic of the sci-fi genre. Once again, the boys try to get at what makes the other tick and just what makes a great movie anyway. Also, you’ll never guess the very tenuous connection between the two films. No, really. You won’t.

Next: there’s somethin’ strange in your neighborhood, and it’s Paul Feig’s distaff Ghostbusters reboot.

(Show notes for “Motorcycle Ninjas on the Forbidden Planet.”)