Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 340, “Batman: A Death in the Family (feat. Kenn Edwards)”

Gobbledygeek episode 340, “Batman: A Death in the Family (feat. Kenn Edwards),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

For the (belated) inaugural installment of Four-Color Flashback 2018, wherein Paul and Arlo will be discussing a different classic superhero story each month, they’ve recruited their old pal Kenn Edwards to help them discuss Batman: A Death in the Family by writer Jim Starlin and artist Jim Aparo. Kenn knows a thing or two about the Caped Crusader, having been part of the Batman Immortal fan film project. However, he’s never read this particular story, in which the Joker savagely beats Robin to death. That puts him on equal footing with our hosts: it’s one of Arlo’s blind spots and Paul hasn’t read it since it was published in 1988. They’re all a little shocked by how anachronistic its goofy plotting and dialogue seem given its release in a post-Dark Knight Returns landscape. Superhero comics were starting to mature, and this one feels like it may have gotten left behind. The gang discusses the impact of Robin’s death; whether Bruce’s hypocrisy is a bug or a feature; the ludicrous political implications of the Joker’s scheme; and why the follow-up story A Lonely Place of Dying is much better. Plus, Arlo is still watching Disney cartoons.

Next: be vewwy, vewwy quiet. The boys and their pal Nate Curtiss are hunting Krasinskis for a discussion of A Quiet Place.

(Show notes for “Batman: A Death in the Family.”)

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Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 336, “The Young Girls of Rochefort / The Pirate Movie: Killer Booboos and Cartoon Octopi”

Gobbledygeek episode 336, “The Young Girls of Rochefort / The Pirate Movie: Killer Booboos and Cartoon Octopi,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Ahoy and salut! Kicking off a series of occasional musical episodes–as in episodes about musicals; nobody wants to hear our boys sing–inspired by Paul’s love of The Greatest Showman, he and Arlo gear up for a tuneful Geek Challenge. They are both intensely on brand: Arlo challenges Paul to Jacques Demy’s deceptively candy-colored 1967 classic The Young Girls of Rochefort, while Paul forces Arlo to endure Ken Annakin’s inexplicable 1982 swashbuckler The Pirate Movie. They’re surprised to discover that these incredibly different films, besides both being musicals, have some connective tissue: the use of fantasy to escape cruel reality, metatextual references to themselves and other movies, and…well, okay, after that, they’re almost completely different, but come on! Wouldn’t it be cool if Catherine Deneuve danced with a cartoon octopus? Plus, Paul has thoughts on the Star Wars Rebels finale and Arlo has been taking a trip through classic Disney.

Next: Kronos must have forgotten to fold his sheets, because there is now A Wrinkle in Time. I’m sorry. I’m so, so sorry.

(Show notes for “Killer Booboos and Cartoon Octopi.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 332, “The Greatest Showman: The Noblest Art (feat. Nate Curtiss)”

Gobbledygeek episode 332, “The Greatest Showman: The Noblest Art (feat. Nate Curtiss),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Come one, come all to The Greatest Showman, Michael Gracey’s musical retelling (or is that reshaping?) of the life of circus impresario P.T. Barnum. Paul and Arlo are joined by first-time guest Nate Curtiss, whose obsession with the film rivals Paul’s well-documented mania. The gang discusses the film’s message of tolerance and inclusion, why it’s a better musical than La La Land, and if it’s a problem that the filmmakers have refashioned Barnum as a beacon of progressivism. Plus, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are back (did they ever leave?), which is making some fans unhappy (aren’t they always?); and The Cloverfield Paradox was a surprise post-Super Bowl release on Netflix.

Next: last year’s Four-Color Flashback finally comes to a close, as Kenn Edwards joins us to discuss Y: The Last Man – Vol. 10: Whys and Wherefores.

(Show notes for “The Noblest Art.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 330, “The X-Files: Season 7 (feat. Wesley Mead)”

Gobbledygeek episode 330, “The X-Files: Season 7 (feat. Wesley Mead),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

No TV show is at its best seven seasons in, as Paul, Arlo, and special British guest Wesley “Wezzo” Mead can attest. The gang has just watched season 7 of Chris Carter’s seminal sci-fi series The X-Files, and they have questions: Why would anyone think that was a satisfying resolution to the Samantha Mulder storyline? Why is Dana Scully, one of the greatest female characters in all of genre fiction, consistently robbed of agency? Why is Chris Carter the worst writer on his own show? Why didn’t the show just end here? In addition to lamenting the season’s VR fantasmagorias and double scoops of Kathy Griffin, the gang does find praise for cast members going behind the camera and Vince Gilligan inching ever closer toward Breaking Bad. Plus, Paul continues to visit The Greatest Showman; Wezzo tells us of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Somebody Feed Phil, and Inside No. 9; and gosh, politics are just AWFUL.

Next: Paul and Arlo dive into Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water.

(Show notes for “The X-Files: Season 7.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 329, “Black Mirror: Shattered Reflections (feat. Sarah Kosheff)”

Gobbledygeek episode 329, “Black Mirror: Shattered Reflections (feat. Sarah Kosheff),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are through the tweeting glass. First-time guest Sarah Kosheff joins Paul and Arlo to discuss Charlie Brooker’s sci-fi anthology series Black Mirror in general, and the new fourth season in particular. The gang discusses how the series explores the intersection of technology and society, if the “what if phones but too much” line of criticism is reductive, if the idea of a Black Mirror “shared universe” is in any way appealing, and more. Plus, Paul meets The Greatest Showman, Arlo and Sarah marvel at The Shape of Water, and Arlo finally puts Paul in his mouth.

Next: famed Briton Wesley “Wezzo” Mead stops by once again to discuss Chris Carter’s seminal sci-fi series The X-Files. This time, the gang will discuss season 7.

(Show notes for “Shattered Reflections.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 318, “Spider-Man: Homecoming – She Bought Me a Churro (feat. Heather Wiley)”

Gobbledygeek episode 318, “Spider-Man: Homecoming – She Bought Me a Churro (feat. Heather Wiley),” is available for listening and download right here and on iTunes here.

It’s a Wiley whammy as first-time guest Heather Wiley joins Gobbledygeek’s very own Arlo Wiley in teaming up to finally take down Paul. Actually, this is a pretty convivial episode, as all three agree that Spider-Man: Homecoming is not only one of the better Spider-Man movies–some on this podcast would venture to call it the best–but one of the better entries in the Marvel Cinematic Universe thus far. The gang discusses why that is: the familiar yet fresh take on our friendly neighborhood webhead, an effortless mix of comedy and drama, a believable villain who doesn’t want to shoot giant beams of light into the sky, genuine Queens-like diversity, and killer turns from Tom Holland and Michael Keaton. Plus, Paul conducted a Mozart in the Jungle binge, Arlo got together with Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, and Heather tries to piece together if she and Arlo are indeed blood relatives.

Next: War for the Planet of the Apes is hell.

(Show notes for “Spider-Man: Homecoming – She Bought Me a Churro.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 277, “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Records Your Podcast (feat. Matthew Jackson)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 277, “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Records Your Podcast (feat. Matthew Jackson),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

After many months of mounting obsession, Paul and Arlo finally tackle Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway phenomenon Hamilton: An American Musical. (We hope you’ve been willing to wait for it.) Joining them is fellow Hamilton superfan Matthew Jackson, a contributing editor for Blastr.com and entertainment writer for Playboy.com. The gang discusses the impact Hamilton has had on them, its dizzying structure (both in terms of story and stage), the radical way it melds hip-hop with theater with history, and its new behind-the-scenes book Hamilton: The Revolution. Plus, there’s a remembrance of the late, great comics artist and writer Darwyn Cooke.

Next: Paul and Arlo continue their year-long Four-Color Flashback exploration of Matt Wagner’s Grendel with “Devil’s Legacy, Pt. 2,” collected in Grendel Omnibus: Vol. 2, pp. 247-370.

(Show notes for “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Records Your Podcast.”)