Listen to Episode 355, “Gobbledyween: The Witch (feat. Matthew Jackson)”

Gobbledygeek episode 355, “Gobbledyween: The Witch (feat. Matthew Jackson),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Leaves are on the ground, blood is on the silver screen. It’s time for Gobbledyween. Paul and Arlo’s beloved horror movie festival returns for the first time since 2015, and their opening selection debuted that same year: Robert Eggers’ new cult classic The Witch. Emerging from the wood to terrorize the boys is SyfyWire.com contributing editor Matthew Jackson. The gang discusses the rural dread Eggers exploits, if the film can be read as an empowerment tale, if anything on the screen actually happens, and more. Plus, Paul grooves to synthwave, Jon Favreau gears up for The Mandalorian, Arlo worships Nicolas Cage in Panos Cosmatos’ Mandy, and Spider-Ham makes his screen debut in the new Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse trailer.

Next: Gobbledyween continues as filmmaker Jess Byard joins us to take a bite out of Kathryn Bigelow’s Near Dark.

(Show notes for “Gobbledyween: The Witch.”)

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Listen to Episode 203, “I’ll Lick the Stamps”

psycho

Gobbledygeek episode 203, “I’ll Lick the Stamps,” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

Close the shower curtain, it’s time for Gobbledyween! Our fifth annual month-long celebration of all things bump in the night gets off to a slashing start with a discussion of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 classic Psycho. Often imitated (once quite literally) but never duplicated, Paul and AJ dissect the film’s shifting points of view, the many taboos it broke, how its lengthy silences speak volumes, and yeah, that really dumb psychoanalysis scene. Plus, AJ joins Nicolas Cage for a post-Rapture nap with Left Behind while Paul goes to Disney Infinity and beyond with the new Marvel superheroes expansion.

Next: Gobbledyween 2014 comes back to life as Broken Magic author and The Deli Counter of Justice cohort Eric Sipple drops by for a look back at Re-Animator.

(Show notes for “I’ll Lick the Stamps.”)

11 Great Movies Which Didn’t Garner a Single Oscar Nomination This Year

I am not the half of Gobbledygeek who loathes the Oscars; in fact, they’re an annual tradition in my house. This year, we even ponied up for chocolate Oscar statuettes powdered with gold. We don’t mess around. Amazingly, I even liked seven of this year’s nine Best Picture nominees (the odd ones out being War Horse and, ugh, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close). At the same time, I realize that the Academy often fails to recognize some truly brilliant films, and in the interest of counter-programming, I thought I’d point out some of the ones it missed this year.

These films didn’t garner a single Oscar nod this year (if it wasn’t for Sound Editing, Drive would be all up in here), and were actually eligible by Academy rules (otherwise, I would have spotlighted The Sunset Limited yet again, alongside the hilarious concert film Louis C.K.: Live at the Beacon Theater).

We’ve got 11 great movies here, divided up into three categories. To get us started…

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Listen to Episode 84, “Live and Die on This Day”

Gobbledygeek episode 84, “Live and Die on This Day,” is available for listening or download right here.

The first surprise of 2012 is The Grey, the Liam Neeson survival film whose trailers could be politely described as Taken, Only by Wolves. However, such is not the case, and Paul and AJ discuss the movie’s meditative reflections on life, death, and the human will to survive. And, yes, the movie’s depiction of wolves as supernatural beasts…and whether or not any wolfpunching occurs. Plus, AJ details his remedy for illness (it involves a bad Nicolas Cage movie) and Paul talks about Kevin Smith’s new reality show Comic Book Men.

Next: The boys interview Joanna Gaskell of the web series Standard Action.

(Show notes for “Live and Die on This Day.”)

Movie Review: Kick-Ass (2010)

Originally published on April 19, 2010

Director: Matthew Vaughn
Writers: Jane Goldman and Matthew Vaughn, based on the comic book by Mark Millar and John Romita Jr.

Kick-Ass is not particularly well-made. It is not particularly well-written. With some exceptions, it is not even particularly well-acted. It is absolute trash, and yet that is part of its appeal. The Mark Millar/John Romita Jr. comic book upon which it is based was slick and stylish, and felt very much in the tradition of ultra-violent superhero satire. Matthew Vaughn’s film, on the other hand, is scrappy and unpolished, getting by solely on its foul-mouthed, blood-spattered charm, much of it due to a pint-sized, purple-clad powerhouse.

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