Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 358, “The Brunette Wore Mauve”

Gobbledygeek episode 358, “The Brunette Wore Mauve,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Jazz hands, everyone! It’s time for a new episode of the new era of Gobbledygeek, which is either painfully self-indulgent or–well, there is no other option, BUT. Paul and Arlo freestyle about why they’re freestyling, discuss how perspectives on art change, extoll the complicated virtues of Miles Davis and Queen, and become flummoxed at the hyper-realistic minutiae of Red Dead Redemption 2.

Next: back to your regularly scheduled podcast with a Four-Color Flashback discussion of Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters.

(Show notes for “The Brunette Wore Mauve.”)

Advertisements

‘Batman: Arkham City’ Review: Who Has the Last Laugh?

When Batman: Arkham Asylum was released in 2009, it was nothing short of a revolution for superhero video games. Before, there had been a handful of great superhero games, but most of them had been arcade side-scrollers or team brawlers (Activision’s first Spider-Man game is a notable exception). Arkham Asylum, however, placed you so fully in Bruce Wayne’s combat boots that it actually felt as if you got to know the hero better just by pushing some buttons and toggling an analog stick. Not only did you battle some of the Dark Knight’s greatest villains, you also sneaked around in the shadows, stealthily taking out bad guys before they even noticed you were upon them. The mix of fighting-and-hiding was extremely addictive and felt like the reinvention of an entire genre.

At the time, it would have been ridiculous to look at Arkham Asylum and go, “Great game, but look at all that untapped potential!” After having played Arkham City, though, it’s a reasonable reaction. Almost everything that was great about the first game has been refined, perfected, and expanded to create the most immersive superhero game yet released. The most obvious example is the fact that you can actually explore the vastness of Arkham City itself. One of the joys of the original was exploring the asylum grounds, but now that a portion of Gotham has been cordoned off as one big looney bin, you can glide past skyscrapers and swing from building to building. Whenever you get frustrated with a side mission or tire of beating down thugs, you can revel in the simple pleasure of zipping around the city, an exhilarating experience in and of itself.

Continue reading

Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture: #90-81

On Friday’s show, Paul and I began our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture. We’ve each got our own lists, and last night we revealed our respective #s 90-81. Be sure to listen to the show for our full run-down, but here are our picks with excerpts of what we said:

#90

PAUL: Tulip O’Hare (Preacher)

She’s a gun-toting, can-take-care-of-herself woman who holds her own against Jesse Custer.

AJ: Margo Channing (All About Eve)

Margo Channing is a great actress, possibly the greatest stage actress of her time. But as one character says, her fault lies in the fact that she knows she’s great.

Continue reading

Listen to Last Night’s Gobbledygeek

Last night’s Gobbledygeek, “The Angry Atheist and the Religious Feminist,” is available for listening right here. Our interview with Faith and Choice in the Works of Joss Whedon author K. Dale Koontz went rather well, I think, and begins at about 45 minutes or so in. We discuss Mal’s belief system, depictions of spirituality in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and why she thinks Dollhouse didn’t work.

As for Paul, Kevin, and I, we discuss our favorite Joss Whedon moments; Paul talks a little bit about Red Dead Redemption; and then we sorta just ramble.