Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 307, “Oh, the Sci-Fi Horror! (feat. Jess Byard)”

Gobbledygeek episode 307, “Oh, the Sci-Fi Horror! (feat. Jess Byard),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Aliens dripping their acidic psychosexual horrors all over you. Artificial intelligence becoming real, seeing and hearing and controlling all you do. Your friends’ flesh peeling back to reveal their true inhuman visage. These are the nightmares conjured by such sci-fi horror classics as Alien, The Terminator, and The Thing, but you may not have seen their likes in recent years. Blumhouse and Birth. Movies. Death. writer Jess Byard joins Paul and Arlo to ask, “Where have all the good sci-fi horror movies gone?” The gang discusses why the genre reached its apex in the ’80s; why it’s so much more difficult to produce (or even conceptualize of) good sci-fi horror these days; and how TV may be picking up the slack. In the middle of all this, technology literally revolts against our hosts. Plus, Paul and Arlo come from the land of the ice and snow to geek out over the giddy Thor: Ragnarok teaser.

Next: a podcast about a podcast. Paul’s better half, Pam Smith, joins the boys to discuss the beautiful, stunning S-Town.

(Show notes for “Oh, the Sci-Fi Horror!”)

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Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 254, “The Science of Poo and Potatoes (feat. Kenn Edwards, Hallie Prime & Ensley F. Guffey)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 254, “The Science of Poo and Potatoes (feat. Kenn Edwards, Hallie Prime & Ensley F. Guffey),” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

There’s a starman waiting in the sky, and his name is Mark Watney. Back in February, we talked a whole bunch (some would argue too much) about the Red Planet’s greatest botanist when we hosted a Gobbledy-Book Club discussion of Andy Weir’s The Martian. Now, Paul and AJ have reconvened the Book Club–Wanna Cook? author Ensley F. Guffey, So Let’s Get to the Point‘s Kenn Edwards, and the all-around amazing Hallie Prime–to tackle Ridley Scott’s star-studded film adaptation. Is there a certain amount of character-building shorthand a filmmaker can accomplish by casting familiar faces? Is the film really the story of a band of precocious potato plants? Does Matt Damon have the chops to be stranded all by his lonesome? And most contentiously…does the science hold up? All this and more, plus what pop culture the gang is excited for.

Next: The Debatable Podcast‘s Greg Sahadachny joins us for our very first Geek Challenge three-way. The movies the boys have challenged each other to this time are Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins, Black Sunday, and The Parallax View.

(Show notes for “The Science of Poo and Potatoes.”)

Listen to Episode 197, “No Means Nostromo”

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Gobbledygeek episode 197, “No Means Nostromo,” is available for listening or download right here, and on iTunes here.

Before there was Juno, there was Alien, the ultimate film about unwanted pregnancy. Eggs shooting down throats, penile heads devouring yours, a brand new lifeform bursting forth from your body…Ridley Scott’s 1979 classic pokes and prods you where you don’t want to be poked and prodded. Paul and AJ kick off an epic podcrawl (see information on participating podcasts in the show notes) about the Alien and Predator films with a look back at the one that started it all, in all its psychosexual glory. Of course, there’s more underneath its skin, including gorgeous photography, eerie sound design, slow-mounting tension, a realistic ensemble, and a star-making performance from Sigourney Weaver. But it’s mostly about dicks. Plus, Gwen Stacy returns to the pages of Spider-Man comics in an unexpected way.

Next: Paul and AJ continue the podcrawl on September 3 with a discussion of John McTiernan’s 1987 classic (?) Predator.

(Show notes for “No Means Nostromo.”)

Listen to Episode 101, “What Does God Need with a Starship?”

Gobbledygeek episode 101, “What Does God Need with a Starship?,” is available for listening or download right here.

Ridley Scott’s Prometheus opened earlier this month and has generated some nerd controversy with its Alien overtones, questionable character motivations, and general ambiguity. Paul and AJ discuss everything they liked about the film (it’s gorgeous!), everything they didn’t (“Yes…father“), and Paul contemplates as many of the film’s big questions as he can before AJ loses interest. Plus, the boys discuss the other Alien films, read an e-mail, and actually get asked a Formspring question for the first time in like a century.

Next: something to do with music. We’d like to say we’re just playing coy, but we honestly have no idea.

(Show notes for “What Does God Need with a Starship?”)

Listen to Episode 100, “The Best (and Worst) of Bat-Turkey”

Gobbledygeek episode 100, “The Best (and Worst) of Bat-Turkey,” is available for listening or download right here.

That’s right, gobblers. 100 episodes. Who’da thunk it? Not us, that’s for sure. If you’re a long-time fan of the show, we’ve got a nice trip down memory lane for you, and if you’re new to our ridiculousness, this is a great primer/history lesson/greatest hits CD. The boys play snippets from various episodes throughout the show’s run, going all the way back to our extremely painful first episode. These things used to be three hours long! And live! Wow. You’ll also hear some of Paul’s finest rants, the boys attempting to tackle the issue of feminism in pop culture, AJ’s fascination with dinosaur-on-dinosaur erotica, and our chats with guests like K. Dale Koontz and Ernie Cline. Plus, some old friends drop by to share their thoughts on the show.

Next: it’s back to your normal, everyday Gobbledygeek with a discussion of Ridley Scott’s Prometheus.

(Show notes for “The Best (and Worst) of Bat-Turkey.”)

‘Prometheus’ Review: Lost in Space

Ridley Scott’s Prometheus has an early shot which undeniably quotes 2001: A Space Odyssey, a beautiful image of a planet ringed with light. There’s some more striking imagery, of an unidentified landscape. A humanoid being removes his cloak and ingests some form of liquid which quickly begins killing him. He sacrificially gives himself to the river, where he falls apart piece by piece, his body possibly giving birth to life as we know it. That’s a provocative beginning for a big-budget science fiction film, one that clearly announces its intentions to be a thoughtful exploration of the creation and destruction of life. As they say, the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

After the cryptic prologue, things get off to a very good start. The crew of the good ship Prometheus–which looks like a jumbo Serenity, but maybe that’s just me–is awakened from cryogenic sleep after two years by the android David (Michael Fassbender). Scientists Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace) and Charlie Holloway (Logan Marshall-Green) have discovered cave paintings from around the world, all of which depict images of a figure gesturing toward the same star pattern. They’ve followed that pattern all the way out to the middle of space, hoping to find the meaning of life, the universe, and everything. There are some big ideas at play here, and in the early going, there are conversations about whether the existence of supposed humanity-creating beings (Engineers, they’re called) negates or supports the existence of God. Holloway posits that because they now know the Engineers exist, the cross Shaw wears around her neck is meaningless. Shaw, with a wink in her eye, then asks where the Engineers came from.

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On DVD & Blu-Ray, 5/31/11: ‘Biutiful,’ ‘Passion Play,’ More

BIUTIFUL (DVD/Blu-ray)

Biutiful is the most recent offering from Alejandro González Iñárritu, he of Amores Perros21 Grams, and Babel, all of which rank among my favorite films. Javier Bardem scored an Oscar nod as Uxbal, who, uh…actually, the synopses of this movie make it really hard to figure out what his deal is, though he’s described as a “tragic hero” and “a single father who struggles to reconcile fatherhood, love, spirituality, crime, guilt and mortality amid the dangerous underworld of modern Barcelona.” So there’s that. I meant to catch this in theaters, but in any case, I’m really looking forward to this one. Extras include a making-of doc and a theatrical trailer.

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