Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 463 – “The Animatrix & The Matrix Resurrections (feat. Tilly Bridges)”

Carrie-Anne Moss and Keanu Reeves in The Matrix Resurrections (2021), directed by Lana Wachowski

Gobbledygeek episode 463, “The Animatrix & The Matrix Resurrections (feat. Tilly Bridges),” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

Why use old code to mirror something new? Writer/producer Tilly Bridges is back to continue last week’s discussion of The Matrix series. This time, she joins Paul and Arlo to chat about 2003’s anime anthology The Animatrix, which fits surprisingly well into the series’ trans allegory; and, for the bulk of this episode, The Matrix Resurrections. Lana Wachowski’s triumphant return to her signature co-creation is strikingly similar to the original films…and strikingly different. The gang discusses Neo/Trinity’s self-actualization, Wachowski’s freer and more open approach to filmmaking, Jonathan Groff’s take on Agent Smith, and so much more.

NEXT: we’ll be back, or we won’t. We probably will be.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:55  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:03:00  –  The Animatrix
  • 00:41:32  –  The Matrix Resurrections
  • 01:51:20  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillow (1967)
  • “Wake Up” by Brass Against, Brass Against (2018)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 462 – “The Matrix Trilogy (feat. Tilly Bridges)”

Carrie-Anne Moss and Keanu Reeves in The Matrix (1999), directed by Lana Wachowski & Lilly Wachowski

Gobbledygeek episode 462, “The Matrix Trilogy (feat. Tilly Bridges),” is available for listening or download right here, on Spotify, and on Apple Podcasts.

Unfortunately, no one can be told what Gobbledygeek is. You have to listen to it for yourself. Writer-producer Tilly Bridges joins Paul and Arlo for the first of a two-part discussion of Lilly & Lana Wachowski’s revolutionary Matrix franchise. This week, the gang discusses the original Matrix trilogy, which was released from 1999-2003 and shattered moviegoers’ preconceived notions of the world around them. In turn, Tilly shatters Paul and Arlo’s preconceived notions of these films by touching on the Wachowskis’ many choices–from dialogue to set design to costuming–that serve to reflect the trans experience.

NEXT: we plug back in to explore The Animatrix and The Matrix Resurrections.

BREAKDOWN

  • 00:00:32  –  Intro / Guest
  • 00:13:47  –  Main Topic
  • 01:55:40  –  Outro / Next

LINKS

MUSIC

  • “Dissolved Girl” by Massive Attack, Mezzanine (1998)
  • “Wake Up” by Rage Against the Machine, Rage Against the Machine (1992)

GOBBLEDYCARES

Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture: #50-41

On last night’s show, Paul and I continued our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture with #s 50-41. Be sure to listen to the show for our full run-downs, but here are some choice excerpts:

#50

PAUL: Toothless (How to Train Your Dragon)

In my opinion, the character’s progression throughout the film is pretty spot-on with what feels like natural behavior, from the frightened, wounded animal in the cove to the trusting “pet” that accepts help from his human to ultimately the loyal friend and protector.

AJ: Rick Blaine (Casablanca)

Humphrey Bogart is one of the greatest actors of all time, and no role better defines his appeal than that of expatriate café owner Rick Blaine.

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Listen to Last Night’s Gobbledygeek

Last night’s Gobbledygeek, “Dream a Little Dream,” is available for listening right here. More GobbledyGaffes(TM), but we do eventually get around to Inception, and whaddaya know, we didn’t drop any spoilers. We did better than we did with Iron Man 2, hard as that is to believe. We do discuss the vaguest of plots, the actors, and heap lavish praise upon Wally Pfister’s cinematography. Paul describes the film as “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind meets The Matrix,” which is pretty apt. We also mention a few movies coming out this fall, and in the bonus hour we continue our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture with #s 70-61.