Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 311, “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Those Who Dance, and Those Who Do Not”

Gobbledygeek episode 311, “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Those Who Dance, and Those Who Do Not,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Family is family, no matter how much they might piss you off. It’s fitting that while the ragtag band of losers at the heart of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 learn this lesson, Paul and Arlo are relearning it. That’s right, kids, the boys’ miraculous and unprecedented string of agreements is over: Paul is tail over paws in love with Vol. 2, while Arlo rides the good ship Kelly McGillis into a sea of disappointment. Are the film’s various character pairings emotionally satisfying? Does Vol. 2 merely rehash everything you loved about the first? Is Michael Rooker a goddamn gift to humanity/Centauriankind? Plus, Paul mind-melds with Sense8 season 2, and Arlo wants to believe with The Leftovers season 3.

Next: after a week off, Ensley F. Guffey will join the boys for the next installment in their (woefully unappreciated) Four-Color Flashback exploring Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra’s Y: The Last Man. This time, they’ll slip on the Ring of Truth for Y: The Last Man – Vol. 5.

(Show notes for “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Those Who Dance, and Those Who Do Not.”)

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Listen to Episode 194, “Groot Suit Riot (feat. Kenn Edwards)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 194, “Groot Suit Riot (feat. Kenn Edwards),” is available for listening or download right here. and on iTunes here.

Come and get your love, boys and girls: the Guardians of the Galaxy have arrived. Paul and AJ abduct the young, impressionable Kenn Edwards (So Let’s Get to the Pointhost/Smoke Gets in Your Ears co-host), leading him on a whirlwind tour of the universe, discussing the finer points of James Gunn’s sci-fi blockbuster. Among those points: whether or not, ten movies in, the film marks progress for Marvel Studios; the unlikely (or perhaps the most likely) breakout characters; and that bitchin’ soundtrack. Plus, AJ goes in for a sleep test and gets back up on his Spider-Ham soapbox.

Next: Joseph Lewis returns for another gathering of the Turtle…uh, Tribe? Is that a thing? Anyway, this time the gang’s discussing the new Michael Bay-produced Ninja Turtles movie.

(Show notes for “Groot Suit Riot.”)

R.I.P. Sidney Lumet (1924-2011)

Sidney Lumet, the film director responsible for such classics as 12 Angry MenDog Day AfternoonNetwork, and Serpico, among others, died today, April 9, 2011, of lymphoma at his Manhattan home. I couldn’t hope to better articulate Lumet’s achievements as a filmmaker than Roger Ebert already has, except to say that Lumet never slowed during his feature film directorial career, which spanned 50 years from 1957 to 2007. He directed so many films, in fact, that it comes as a surprise to me that I’ve only seen a fraction of them. 12 Angry Men is, I would say, one of the ten best movies ever made, with stunning uses of space and perspective which so effectively draw you into the drama onscreen that they’re almost impossible to notice the first time through. But when you go back and examine the film, what was already a great courtroom drama becomes a powerhouse piece of filmmaking.

Even late in his career, Lumet was crafting high-quality movies, like 2006’s Find Me Guilty, the first (and so far only) film to fully realize the dramatic potential Vin Diesel had teased in Saving Private Ryan. It’s another courtroom drama, but much different than 12 Angry Men; Diesel’s Jack DiNorsico is a colorful character, one Diesel and Lumet seem to effortlessly elevate from wiseguy stereotype. If you haven’t seen it–and from its dismal box office take, I’d wager many haven’t–I highly recommend it.

Lumet was nominated for four Best Director Academy Awards, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon, Network, and The Verdict. His screenplay for Prince of the City, co-written with Jay Presson Allen, was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. Lumet won an honorary Oscar, richly deserved, in 2005.