Listen to Gobbledygeek 388 – “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Patrice Jennings and Billy Warlock in Brian Yuzna’s ‘Society’ (1989).

Gobbledygeek episode 338, “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme: the rich have always sucked off the poor, and podcasting icon Greg Sahadachny has always joined Gobbledyween for the most ridiculous and outrageous pick of the season. This time, Paul and Arlo have chosen to torment Greg with Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society, which is a dumb teen sex comedy until–well, until it isn’t. The gang discusses the film’s subtext and/or screaming neon text; Screaming Mad George’s “surrealistic makeup effects”; how the movie surprisingly rewards repeat viewings; and the film’s unlikely parallels to Lynch, Friedkin, Polanski, and a whole buncha other pretentious arthouse weirdos.

Next: Gobbledyween comes to a close as Broken Magic author Eric Sipple joins us to discuss Emil Ferris’ graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:14:44

  • 00:00:45  –  Intro
  • 00:03:42  –  Society
  • 01:09:00  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “The Eton Boating Song (feat. Helen Moore)” by A.D.E.W., Mark Ryder & Phil Davies, Society (Motion Picture Soundtrack) (1989)
  • “Society Is My Friend” by Kurt Vile, Smoke Ring for My Halo (2011)

‘Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close’ Review: Mc9/11

The Ultimate Gift is the worst movie I’ve ever seen. You probably haven’t heard of it. Good for you. I don’t want to imply that it’s well-made, because it’s not, but there are certainly worse-made movies out there. Little ManDate MovieSpace Mutiny, etc. But The Ultimate Gift is a special brand of awful because it takes a little girl’s cancer and uses it as nothing more than a plot point with which to forward the main character’s journey of self-discovery. Once the main character has supposedly become a better person, the little girl dies and no one really cares. Not sure about you, but to me, that is offensive. Now imagine a movie which does the same, only instead of using a cancer-stricken child, it uses a national tragedy the scope of which is still too large for many Americans to comprehend. Thanks to director Stephen Daldry, screenwriter Eric Roth, and a passel of others, you don’t have to imagine it. They’ve made it. And it’s called Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.

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