Listen to Episode 118, “Blacula Gives a Shout-Out to Bakula”

Gobbledygeek episode 118, “Blacula Gives a Shout-Out to Bakula,” is available for listening or download right here.

This week, Paul and AJ put a stake through the heart of Gobbledyween 2012 with a look at Psych‘s “This Episode Sucks.” AJ has never seen an episode of Psych, so according to him, this is what the show is about: the Santa Barbara Police Department is attempting to investigate a murder whose perpetrator may or may not be a vampire, and while doing so, Turk and J.D. pop up for some reason and start making jokes. Also, Dr. Cox falls in love with Buffy–I’m sorry, Kristy Swanson, it pains AJ too much to call her Buffy. Plus, the guys talk about Joss Whedon’s new video on Mitt Romney’s zombie apocalypse, AJ gushes over Matt Kindt’s Mind MGMT, and Paul loves Cloud Atlas.

Next: with vampires, demons, and the forces of darkness vanquished for another year, Eric Sipple joins us to talk about his new book Broken Magic.

(Show notes for “Blacula Gives a Shout-Out to Bakula.”)

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Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture #60-51

Last week, Paul and I reached the halfway mark of our countdown of the Top 100 Characters in Modern Pop Culture. Here are excerpts of our thoughts on our picks for #s 60-51, but be sure to listen to the show for our full rundowns.

#60

PAUL: Vincent (Beauty and the Beast)

Speaking with a gruff but gentle whisper and all but hidden beneath an impressive leonine Rick Baker prosthesis (which didn’t, but absolutely should have, won awards), Perlman was the very definition of Romantic-with-a-capital-R misunderstood emo monster heroes for a generation.

AJ: John Locke (Lost)

His regained ability to walk gave him a new lease on life, and he looked at the island as a beautiful, supernatural force. He refused to leave, and tried to get the rest of the group to stay as well, believing them to be there for a greater purpose. The constant push-and-pull between Jack, the man of science, and Locke, the man of faith, became the series’ core thematic conflict.

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