Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 391 – “Four-Color Flashback: The Private Eye”

Art from ‘The Private Eye’ (2013) by Marcos Martin & Muntsa Vicente. Dialogue by Brian K. Vaughan.

Gobbledygeek episode 391, “Four-Color Flashback: The Private Eye,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The Cloud burst, and for forty days and forty nights, all of our secrets rained down. In the not terribly distant future world of Brian K. Vaughan, Marcos Martin, and Muntsa Vicente’s 2013-15 series The Private Eye, the Internet is a distant memory and anonymity is now the foundation of American society. Of course, our hero is an amoral paparazzo-slash-private investigator whose job is to dig up those old secrets; of course, this leads him into a world of trouble. For the penultimate Four-Color Flashback of 2019, Paul and Arlo discuss Vaughan’s clever utilization of noir tropes in the post-Internet age, Martin’s dynamic pencils/inks, Vicente’s eye-popping colors (this is one noir that doesn’t hide in the shadows), their radical pay-what-you-want self-publishing platform Panel Syndicate, and the big philosophical question at the heart of the book: is the Internet worth it?

Next: for the final Four-Color Flashback of the season, we get existential with Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba’s Daytripper.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:31:30

  • 00:00:22  – Intro
  • 00:04:10  – Main Topic
  • 01:27:00  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Private Eyes” by Daryl Hall & John Oates, Private Eyes (1981)
  • “This Masquerade” by The Carpenters, Now & Then (1973)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 390 – “Freegobble: Return to InfoPrison”

A Shakey’s Pizza in the wild.

Gobbledygeek episode 390, “Freegobble: Return to InfoPrison,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Ever have a job so shitty, it haunts you years (or even decades) down the line? Paul and Arlo have, and it’s called Gobbledygeek! Hey-o! In all seriousness (?), Paul recounts a traumatic experience at Shakey’s Pizza and Arlo is filled with regret over his time at the right-wing call center InfoCision. Cue flashbacks to high school football teams ravenous for wings and evil televangelists separating the faithful from what little coin they carry. Speaking of the latter, Arlo laments Kanye West’s evangelical turn on Jesus Is King. Elsewhere, Paul watches TV, including Succession, Primal, Daybreak, Watchmen, and Modern Love; and braves crowds of drunken revelers at shows for Bastille, Joywave, Trampled by Turtles, and The Avett Bros.

Next: TBD.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:39:58

  • 00:00:33  –  Intro
  • 00:01:12  –  We are NOT sponsored by the Gobble meal delivery service
  • 00:07:30  –  Cold pizza and really, really hot wings
  • 00:14:43  –  Way too much about InfoCision
  • 00:43:48  –  Not nearly enough about some great new TV shows
  • 00:54:08  –  More than a little bit about Succession
  • 01:07:20  –  Unfortunately, we discuss the new Kanye album
  • 01:15:30  –  A Popeye’s chicken sandwich interlude
  • 01:17:15  –  Back to Kanye (and controversial comments on Beyoncé)
  • 01:24:31  –  Lastly, Paul’s been to some concerts
  • 01:37:05  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “This Fucking Job” by Drive-By Truckers, The Big To-Do (2010)
  • “Blastoffff” by Joywave, Blastoffff (Single) (2018)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 389 – “Gobbledyween / FCF: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (feat. Eric Sipple)”

Art from ‘My Favorite Thing Is Monsters’ (2017) by Emil Ferris.

Gobbledygeek episode 389, “Gobbledyween / FCF: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (feat. Eric Sipple),” is available for listening or download here and on iTunes here.

Our favorite thing is Gobbledyween, so to close out this year’s frightening festivities, Paul and Arlo are breaking from the norm to discuss Emil Ferris’ 2017 graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. Joining them for this first Gobbledyween/Four-Color Flashback crossover is their The Deli Counter of Justice collaborator Eric Sipple. The gang marvels at Ferris’ stunning art (all done in ballpoint pen!), attempts to process the numerous threads in this first of two planned volumes (sexuality, duality, and reality, oh my!), draws unexpected parallels to Art Spiegelman’s Maus (a FCF entry just this past August!), and so much more (no parenthetical necessary!). We promise there are monsters.

Next: and I’m freeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, free Gooooobbliiiiiiin’.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:42:55

  • 00:00:44  – Intro
  • 00:03:20  – My Favorite Thing is Monsters
  • 01:36:51  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Wild Thing” by The Troggs, From Nowhere (1966)
  • “Good Monsters” by Jars of Clay, Good Monsters (2006)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek 388 – “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Patrice Jennings and Billy Warlock in Brian Yuzna’s ‘Society’ (1989).

Gobbledygeek episode 338, “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme: the rich have always sucked off the poor, and podcasting icon Greg Sahadachny has always joined Gobbledyween for the most ridiculous and outrageous pick of the season. This time, Paul and Arlo have chosen to torment Greg with Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society, which is a dumb teen sex comedy until–well, until it isn’t. The gang discusses the film’s subtext and/or screaming neon text; Screaming Mad George’s “surrealistic makeup effects”; how the movie surprisingly rewards repeat viewings; and the film’s unlikely parallels to Lynch, Friedkin, Polanski, and a whole buncha other pretentious arthouse weirdos.

Next: Gobbledyween comes to a close as Broken Magic author Eric Sipple joins us to discuss Emil Ferris’ graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:14:44

  • 00:00:45  –  Intro
  • 00:03:42  –  Society
  • 01:09:00  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “The Eton Boating Song (feat. Helen Moore)” by A.D.E.W., Mark Ryder & Phil Davies, Society (Motion Picture Soundtrack) (1989)
  • “Society Is My Friend” by Kurt Vile, Smoke Ring for My Halo (2011)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 387 – “Gobbledyween: Near Dark (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

Bill Paxton in Kathryn Bigelow’s ‘Near Dark’ (1987).

Gobbledygeek episode 387, “Gobbledyween: Near Dark (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

It finally happened. After three long years of behind-the-scenes turmoil, Near Dark has made its way to Gobbledyween. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins Paul and Arlo to discuss Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampiric Western, which reimagined the creatures of the night as filthy, lowdown rednecks. The gang discusses the influence Near Dark has had on vampire fiction, the late great Bill Paxton’s immortal performance as Severen, the film’s surprisingly conservative stance on biological family, and how surprisingly difficult it is to get ahold of the movie these days.

Next: Gobbledyween lives in a society. Greg Sahadachny joins us to talk Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:33:05

  • 00:00:45  – Intro
  • 00:03:44  – Near Dark
  • 01:24:22  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Fever” by The Cramps, Songs the Lord Taught Us (1980)
  • “The Cowboy Rides Away” by George Strait, Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind (1984)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 386 – “Gobbledyween: The Cabin in the Woods”

Anna Hutchinson, Chris Hemsworth, Kristen Connolly, Jesse Williams, and Fran Kranz in Drew Goddard’s ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ (2011).

Gobbledygeek episode 386, “Gobbledyween: The Cabin in the Woods,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Leaves are on the ground, blood is on the screen. It’s time once again for Gobbledyween, that most beloved of Gobbledygeek institutions–and one that has not reared its horrific head in full since 2015! All month long, Paul and Arlo will be discussing horror or horror-adjacent movies, starting with one they actually discussed seven years ago: Drew Goddard’s mega-meta 2011 genre critique The Cabin in the Woods. The boys reveal why they’re revisiting the film (hint: it involves sheer incompetence!), break down Goddard and co-writer/producer Joss Whedon’s refutation of horror stereotypes, compare Cabin’s prevailing sense of nihilism to the pragmatic hope on display in Buffy and Angel, and go nuts trying to name all the monsters we see on screen.

Next: the night, it’s deafening. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins us to discuss–finally–Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampire Western Near Dark.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:43:03

  • 00:00:35  – Intro
  • 00:11:12  – The Cabin in the Woods
  • 01:40:36  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Horror Movies” by Dickie Goodman (1961)
  • “Last” by Nine Inch Nails, Broken (1992)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 385 – “Four-Color Flashback: Green River Killer”

Art from ‘Green River Killer: A True Detective Story’ by Jonathan Case. Dialogue by Jeff Jensen.

Gobbledygeek episode 385, “Four-Color Flashback: Green River Killer,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

For another installment of this year’s non-superhero Four-Color Flashback, Paul and Arlo look at the story of a real-life hero in Green River Killer: A True Detective Story, Jeff Jensen and Jonathan Case’s loving tribute to Jeff’s dad, Detective Tom Jensen. Detective Jensen was instrumental in catching Gary Leon Ridgway AKA the Green River Killer, America’s most prolific serial killer. The boys discuss Paul’s connection to (and possible culpability in?!) the case, the comparisons or lack thereof to the father-son dynamic in Maus, Case’s beautiful character acting, and more.

Next: leaves are on the ground, blood is on the screen. It’s time for Gobbledyween. We kick off this year’s festivities with a(nother) discussion of Drew Goddard’s 2011 mega-meta horror film The Cabin in the Woods.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:15:25

  • 00:00:35  – Intro
  • 00:02:00  – Green River Killer
  • 01:09:47  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  1. “Green River” by Creedence Clearwater Revival, Green River (1969)
  2. “Deep Red Bells” by Neko Case, Blacklisted (2002)

THE LINKS

  1. “Writer Jeff Jensen Talks Dark Horse’s Green River Killer: A True Detective Story”, diamondcomics.com