Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 387 – “Gobbledyween: Near Dark (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

Bill Paxton in Kathryn Bigelow’s ‘Near Dark’ (1987).

Gobbledygeek episode 387, “Gobbledyween: Near Dark (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

It finally happened. After three long years of behind-the-scenes turmoil, Near Dark has made its way to Gobbledyween. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins Paul and Arlo to discuss Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampiric Western, which reimagined the creatures of the night as filthy, lowdown rednecks. The gang discusses the influence Near Dark has had on vampire fiction, the late great Bill Paxton’s immortal performance as Severen, the film’s surprisingly conservative stance on biological family, and how surprisingly difficult it is to get ahold of the movie these days.

Next: Gobbledyween lives in a society. Greg Sahadachny joins us to talk Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:33:05

  • 00:00:45  – Intro
  • 00:03:44  – Near Dark
  • 01:24:22  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Fever” by The Cramps, Songs the Lord Taught Us (1980)
  • “The Cowboy Rides Away” by George Strait, Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind (1984)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 386 – “Gobbledyween: The Cabin in the Woods”

Anna Hutchinson, Chris Hemsworth, Kristen Connolly, Jesse Williams, and Fran Kranz in Drew Goddard’s ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ (2011).

Gobbledygeek episode 386, “Gobbledyween: The Cabin in the Woods,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Leaves are on the ground, blood is on the screen. It’s time once again for Gobbledyween, that most beloved of Gobbledygeek institutions–and one that has not reared its horrific head in full since 2015! All month long, Paul and Arlo will be discussing horror or horror-adjacent movies, starting with one they actually discussed seven years ago: Drew Goddard’s mega-meta 2011 genre critique The Cabin in the Woods. The boys reveal why they’re revisiting the film (hint: it involves sheer incompetence!), break down Goddard and co-writer/producer Joss Whedon’s refutation of horror stereotypes, compare Cabin’s prevailing sense of nihilism to the pragmatic hope on display in Buffy and Angel, and go nuts trying to name all the monsters we see on screen.

Next: the night, it’s deafening. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins us to discuss–finally–Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampire Western Near Dark.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:43:03

  • 00:00:35  – Intro
  • 00:11:12  – The Cabin in the Woods
  • 01:40:36  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Horror Movies” by Dickie Goodman (1961)
  • “Last” by Nine Inch Nails, Broken (1992)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 385 – “Four-Color Flashback: Green River Killer”

Art from ‘Green River Killer: A True Detective Story’ by Jonathan Case. Dialogue by Jeff Jensen.

Gobbledygeek episode 385, “Four-Color Flashback: Green River Killer,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

For another installment of this year’s non-superhero Four-Color Flashback, Paul and Arlo look at the story of a real-life hero in Green River Killer: A True Detective Story, Jeff Jensen and Jonathan Case’s loving tribute to Jeff’s dad, Detective Tom Jensen. Detective Jensen was instrumental in catching Gary Leon Ridgway AKA the Green River Killer, America’s most prolific serial killer. The boys discuss Paul’s connection to (and possible culpability in?!) the case, the comparisons or lack thereof to the father-son dynamic in Maus, Case’s beautiful character acting, and more.

Next: leaves are on the ground, blood is on the screen. It’s time for Gobbledyween. We kick off this year’s festivities with a(nother) discussion of Drew Goddard’s 2011 mega-meta horror film The Cabin in the Woods.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:15:25

  • 00:00:35  – Intro
  • 00:02:00  – Green River Killer
  • 01:09:47  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  1. “Green River” by Creedence Clearwater Revival, Green River (1969)
  2. “Deep Red Bells” by Neko Case, Blacklisted (2002)

THE LINKS

  1. “Writer Jeff Jensen Talks Dark Horse’s Green River Killer: A True Detective Story”, diamondcomics.com

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 384 – “Four-Color Flashback: Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (feat. Eric Sipple)”

Art from ‘Maus: A Survivor’s Tale’ by Art Spiegelman.

Gobbledygeek episode 384, “Four-Color Flashback: Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (feat. Eric Sipple),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

For the latest installment of this year’s spandex-free Four-Color Flashback, Paul and Arlo tackle a big one: Art Spiegelman’s Maus: A Survivor’s Tale, still the only comic book ever to be awarded a Pulitzer Prize. Joining them to discuss Spiegelman’s harrowing account of his father Vladek’s time in the concentration camps of Nazi-occupied Poland–and Art’s own tense relationship with Vladek–is Broken Magic author and The Deli Counter of Justice co-creator Eric Sipple. The gang discusses Spiegelman’s provocative choice to depict Jews as mice, Nazis as cats, Poles as pigs, etc.; how Spiegelman follows in a tradition going all the way back to Mickey Mouse; and why it’s specifically disturbing to read Maus in 2019.

Next: Paul and Arlo will return.

(Show notes for “Four-Color Flashback: Maus: A Survivor’s Tale.”)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 383 – “Salty Spiders”

Gobbledygeek episode 383, “Salty Spiders,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The Amazon is burning and all anyone cares about is Spider-Man. Yay! Welcome to another exciting episode of Gobbledygeek! After nixing a fash-bashing Geek Challenge because Paul absolutely could not sit through three hours of The Sound of Music, he and Arlo decide to freestyle it and, well, all is not well! The world’s on fire, the government is imploding, and Spider-Man might not get to be an Avenger anymore! As for that last one, the boys have deeply conflicted feelings about their love for the character and the Marvel movies with their disdain for Disney the Evil Empire. Plus, Arlo still won’t watch all the things Paul says he should watch, and Marc Maron chimes in.

Next: for even more lighthearted family fun, the boys have asked their The Deli Counter of Justice co-editor Eric Sipple to join them for a discussion of Art Spiegelman’s Pulitzer Prize-winning, extremely depressing yet extremely essential, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale.

(Show notes for “Salty Spiders.”)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 382 – “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood (feat. Joseph Lewis & Kenn Edwards)”

Gobbledygeek episode 382, “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood (feat. Joseph Lewis & Kenn Edwards),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

A long time ago in an industry far, far away…the end was nigh for Hollywood’s good ol’ days. Charles Manson had arrived, Family in tow, to disrupt the neverending Summer of Love. Quentin Tarantino’s ninth (and penultimate?) film, Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood, takes a look at L.A. in 1969, as Leonardo DiCaprio’s washed-up actor and Brad Pitt’s mysterious stuntman cross paths with rising star (and future Manson victim) Sharon Tate, here played by Margot Robbie. Joining Paul and Arlo to navigate Tarantino’s exploration of a half-century’s worth of pop culture detritus are former Smoke Gets in Your Ears co-hosts Joseph Lewis and Kenn Edwards. The gang discusses the film’s languid pace, how Once Upon a Time compares to Tarantino alternate histories like Inglourious Basterds or Django Unchained, the ways in which the film pointedly interrogates various problematic aspects of its writer-director, and–of course–the groovy soundtrack.

Next: Nazis! We hate those guys. So do the heroes of The Sound of Music and The Great Dictator, subjects of our latest Geek Challenge.

(Show notes for “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood.”)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 381 – “Four-Color Flashback: Hip Hop Family Tree”

Art from ‘Hip Hop Family Tree’ by Ed Piskor.

Gobbledygeek episode 381, “Four-Color Flashback: Hip Hop Family Tree,” is a available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Paul and Arlo are in the place to be, rapping about Ed Piskor’s Hip Hop Family Tree. For the latest Four-Color Flashback installment, our nerdy white heroes take on nerdy white cartoonist Piskor’s quartet (so far) of graphic novels discussing the history of hip hop culture. The boys discuss Piskor’s art, equally indebted to underground comix and superhero books of the ‘70s and ‘80s; how the physical editions beautifully replicate the aesthetics of the time period; how Piskor captures the rhythm and fluidity of DJs and breakdancers; and what in the hell he’s got against Russell “Rush” Simmons.

Next: Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood is Family-friendly entertainment.

(Show notes for “Four-Color Flashback: Hip Hop Family Tree.”)