Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 407 – “Chucky at the Blockbuster Museum”

Gobbledygeek episode 407, “Chucky at the Blockbuster Museum,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The beauty of Gobbledygeek freestyle episodes is that Paul and Arlo will hop on the microphone and start yammering about something or other, then next thing you know, bam, it’s been a tight 45 on the Child’s Play franchise. Killer doll movies, killer German time travel shows (what up, Dark), killer longings for idealized video stores of yesteryear, killer viruses–this episode’s got it all. It will kill you.

Next: speaking of somebody who got killed, Hamilton: An American Musical comes to Disney+.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:49:40

  • 00:00:20  –  Intro
  • 01:45:06  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Chucky Rap” by Daddyphatsnaps, Chucky Rap (2019)
  • “The Buddi Song” by Mark Hamill & Bear McCreary, Child’s Play (2019)

 

 

 

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 401 – “Texed”

Original art ‘Sam-Chan’ by CrispyToastYT.

Gobbledygeek episode 401, “Texed,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

We’re all responding to quarantine (semi- or otherwise) in different ways. Paul seems to be practicing some sort of immersion therapy, living out the post-apocalypse in games like The Last of Us and shows like The Leftovers. Arlo, meanwhile, reaches for the comfort of old reliable favorites like the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie or the modern classic sketch comedy series Key and Peele. Have you ever realized they’re different people? The boys discuss texting syntax, Paul’s genuine repulsion at a certain aspect of The Leftovers, Arlo’s journey through old superhero comics, and so much (or at least a little) more.

Next: TBD, as per ush.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:58:01

  • 00:00:27  –  Intro
  • 01:55:00  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Gunfight Epiphany” by Robert Duncan, Gunfight Epiphany (Theme from Terriers) (2010)
  • “Let the Mystery Be” by Iris DeMent, Infamous Angel (1992)

Listen to the ‘Gobbledygeek’ Bonus Episode “Feels Like the First Time”

The original Bat-Turkey, an extremely poor fusion of clip art and Arlo’s less than rudimentary MS Paint skills.

The Gobbledygeek bonus episode “Feels Like the First Time” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Once upon a time, three idiots did a podcast. Their names were Paul Smith, Arlo “AJ” Wiley, and Joseph “Will Penley” Lewis. And no, we’re not talking about Gobbledygeek episode 400–we’re talking about the very first episode, recorded a full decade ago. This painful, awkward reminder of where it all began has been lost to time and/or the BlogTalkRadio servers for at least a few years now. Now, it has been restored–but never remastered–to its proper glory. Relive the earliest day of the podcast, with discussion of Alice in Wonderland, Lost, Joss Whedon, Kevin Smith, and a whole bunch of random nerd shit they did not have the faculties to properly critique. Enjoy?

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 399 – “Disclaimer: Not a Criminal Act”

Jennifer Garner in Gary Winick’s ’13 Going on 30′ (2004). Her face upon realizing she has boobs has become humanity’s face upon awakening each morning.

Gobbledygeek episode 399, “Disclaimer: Not a Criminal Act,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

FIRST THING’S FIRST: Paul obliquely confesses a past sin during this episode, it’s kind of a super tense moment, but Arlo has cleared off-mic that it was not a criminal act! So…do with that what you will! Elsewhere, the world is fucking ending, so you might as well watch The End of the Fucking World. Paul and Arlo muse on the collapse of civilization, discuss proper social distancing etiquette, and recommend things to watch and read as society dissolves. Some of those recommendations: The Hunt, now available on VOD since movie theaters have shuttered; comfy junk food movies like Yes Man and Ghosts of Girlfriends Past; Netflix’s I Am Not Okay with This; Hawkeye: Freefall by Matthew Rosenberg and Otto Schmidt; Matt Fraction and Steve Lieber’s uproarious Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen; and, of course, perennial classic Good Burger.

Next: Ten years. 400 episodes. It’s all led to this. It’s a shame we’re all dying.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 02:08:53

  • 00:00:46  –  Random thoughts on the end of the world
  • 00:59:30  –  Paul interrupts the flow to obliquely confess a past sin
  • 01:13:00  –  What to watch / read as we slowly go mad and die alone
  • 02:02:26  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Doom Days” by Bastille, Doom Days (2019)
  • “Make Art Not Friends” by Sturgill Simpson, SOUND & FURY (2019)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 397 – “Four-Color Flashback: Black Hammer”

Art by Dean Ormston (pencils/inks) & Dave Stewart (color) from ‘Black Hammer: Age of Doom’ (2018)

Gobbledygeek episode 397, “Four-Color Flashback: Black Hammer,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Don’t you just hate it when you’re a superhero who saves the world and then gets zapped to a shitty little farm town in another dimension that you literally cannot leave? In Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston’s Dark Horse series Black Hammer, Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, Barbalien, Talky-Walky, Colonel Weird, and Madame Dragonfly sure do. For this month’s Four-Color Flashback, Paul and Arlo discuss the recently concluded “main” storyline of Lemire and Ormston’s ever-expanding creation, consisting of Black Hammer issues #1-13 and Black Hammer: Age of Doom issues #1-12. From a backwater farm to the furthest reaches of time and space, our heroes explore every facet of the superhero genre. Along the way, they confront the metatextual realities of comics storytelling–and the just plain textual fact of aging.

Next: we have no plans.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 02:33:48

  • 00:00:37  –  Intro
  • 00:02:14  –  Black Hammer
  • 02:29:10  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “(Don’t Go Back To) Rockville” by R.E.M., Reckoning (1984)
  • “How You Gonna Keep ‘Em Down On the Farm” by Andrew Bird, Soldier On (2007)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 396 – “FCF Bonus: HBO’s Watchmen (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Regina King in HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ (2019).

Gobbledygeek episode 396, “FCF Bonus: HBO’s Watchmen (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

No one, especially not Alan Moore, ever really wanted a Watchmen sequel. Which is exactly why handing the reins to Damon Lindelof, who has a history of disorienting and upsetting expectations, is a stroke of genius. Last year’s HBO series, spearheaded by Lindelof, is a bold, startling continuation of Moore and Dave Gibbons’ graphic novel masterpiece–so of course, after talking about the book, Paul, Arlo, and reformed podcaster Greg Sahadachny had to discuss the TV show. The gang talks about the ways in which Lindelof subverts and pays tribute to Moore and Gibbons’ work; how Lindelof built a writers’ room with people who were not like him; the show’s provocative exploration of race and authority; whether or not the show sticks the landing; and much, much more.

Next: due to one scheduling kerfuffle after another, we’ve got another Four-Color Flashback for you! Paul and Arlo will discuss Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston’s Black Hammer.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 02:32:50

  • 00:00:30  –  Intro
  • 00:05:40  –  Sturgill Simpson’s A Good Look’n Tour
  • 00:28:28  –  Watchmen
  • 02:28:25  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Turtles All the Way Down” by Sturgill Simpson, Turtles All the Way Down (2014)
  • “Best Clockmaker On Mars” by Sturgill Simpson, Sound & Fury (2019)

THE LINKS

 

 

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 395 – “Four-Color Flashback: Watchmen (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Art by Dave Gibbons from ‘Watchmen’ (1986-87).

Gobbledygeek episode 395, “Four-Color Flashback: Watchmen (feat. Greg Sahadachny).” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

After a year of pointedly discussing no superhero stories, Paul and Arlo revive Four-Color Flashback for a new decade with the big kahuna of all superhero stories: Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ 1986-87 maxi-series Watchmen. Aided by emotional sherpa Greg Sahadachny, once and future host of The Debatable Podcast, the boys openly admit there is no new light to shed on perhaps the most analyzed comic book of all time–then get to shedding. What’s it like reading Watchmen in 2020? In the wake of Damon Lindelof’s TV sequel? The gang finds that, like all great art, Watchmen has not changed in the 33 years since its run wrapped, but we have. In a world where fascism seems much more tangible, where superhero fiction reigns supreme, Moore and Gibbons’ work has taken on a renewed sense of meaning. The gang discusses the book’s formalist genius; our heroes’ utter contempt for those they claim to save; why, for a certain type of reader, Rorschach is a morally just idol; and plenty more.

Next: we continue watching the Watchmen with a discussion of Lindelof’s HBO show.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:50:43

  • 00:00:21  –  Intro
  • 00:04:00  –  Watchmen
  • 01:47:43  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Desolation Row” by Bob Dylan, Highway 61 Revisited (1965)
  • “Cosmic Charlie” by The Grateful Dead, Aoxomoxoa (1969)

THE LINKS

  1. In 1986, Watchmen skewered the way we love superheroes. It’s still as relevant as ever.” by Alex Abad-Santos, Vox
  2. “Watchmen’s Fearful Symmetry: (almost) frame by frame”by Pedro V. Ribeiro, Medium
  3. Sam Hamm’s Watchmen Script

Listen to the Gobbledygeek Season 11 Premiere – “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (feat. Eric Sipple)”

Daisy Ridley and Adam Driver in J.J. Abrams’ ‘Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker.’

Gobbledygeek episode 394, “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (feat. Eric Sipple),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The geeks speak! Gobbledygeek has been resurrected via cloning or Force magic or some shit, and to kick off season 11, Broken Magic author and The Deli Counter of Justice co-creator Eric Sipple has lightspeed-skipped on over to discuss Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker. After adoring The Last Jedi, the gang approached this supposed final film in the Skywalker Saga with heavy amounts of skepticism–well-earned, depending on who you ask. They discuss the mystical, magical malarkey behind Palpatine’s return; how director J.J. Abrams and writer Chris Terrio are uniquely suited to not deliver a satisfying conclusion; the oodles of fan service; what the film’s final scene means for the legacy of Star Wars; and more. Plus, they talk about The Baby Yoda Show AKA The Mandalorian.

Next: it is January 29, 2020. Paul and Arlo are discussing Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen for a Four-Color Flashback. I am tired of this world; these people.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 02:35:50

  • 00:00:00  – Intro
  • 00:02:35  – The Mandalorian
  • 00:28:52  – Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
  • 02:31:20  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Fanfare and Prologue” by John Williams, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (2019)
  • “Finale” by John Williams, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (2019)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 391 – “Four-Color Flashback: The Private Eye”

Art from ‘The Private Eye’ (2013) by Marcos Martin & Muntsa Vicente. Dialogue by Brian K. Vaughan.

Gobbledygeek episode 391, “Four-Color Flashback: The Private Eye,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The Cloud burst, and for forty days and forty nights, all of our secrets rained down. In the not terribly distant future world of Brian K. Vaughan, Marcos Martin, and Muntsa Vicente’s 2013-15 series The Private Eye, the Internet is a distant memory and anonymity is now the foundation of American society. Of course, our hero is an amoral paparazzo-slash-private investigator whose job is to dig up those old secrets; of course, this leads him into a world of trouble. For the penultimate Four-Color Flashback of 2019, Paul and Arlo discuss Vaughan’s clever utilization of noir tropes in the post-Internet age, Martin’s dynamic pencils/inks, Vicente’s eye-popping colors (this is one noir that doesn’t hide in the shadows), their radical pay-what-you-want self-publishing platform Panel Syndicate, and the big philosophical question at the heart of the book: is the Internet worth it?

Next: for the final Four-Color Flashback of the season, we get existential with Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba’s Daytripper.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:31:30

  • 00:00:22  – Intro
  • 00:04:10  – Main Topic
  • 01:27:00  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Private Eyes” by Daryl Hall & John Oates, Private Eyes (1981)
  • “This Masquerade” by The Carpenters, Now & Then (1973)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek 388 – “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Patrice Jennings and Billy Warlock in Brian Yuzna’s ‘Society’ (1989).

Gobbledygeek episode 338, “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme: the rich have always sucked off the poor, and podcasting icon Greg Sahadachny has always joined Gobbledyween for the most ridiculous and outrageous pick of the season. This time, Paul and Arlo have chosen to torment Greg with Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society, which is a dumb teen sex comedy until–well, until it isn’t. The gang discusses the film’s subtext and/or screaming neon text; Screaming Mad George’s “surrealistic makeup effects”; how the movie surprisingly rewards repeat viewings; and the film’s unlikely parallels to Lynch, Friedkin, Polanski, and a whole buncha other pretentious arthouse weirdos.

Next: Gobbledyween comes to a close as Broken Magic author Eric Sipple joins us to discuss Emil Ferris’ graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:14:44

  • 00:00:45  –  Intro
  • 00:03:42  –  Society
  • 01:09:00  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “The Eton Boating Song (feat. Helen Moore)” by A.D.E.W., Mark Ryder & Phil Davies, Society (Motion Picture Soundtrack) (1989)
  • “Society Is My Friend” by Kurt Vile, Smoke Ring for My Halo (2011)