Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 389 – “Gobbledyween / FCF: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (feat. Eric Sipple)”

Art from ‘My Favorite Thing Is Monsters’ (2017) by Emil Ferris.

Gobbledygeek episode 389, “Gobbledyween / FCF: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (feat. Eric Sipple),” is available for listening or download here and on iTunes here.

Our favorite thing is Gobbledyween, so to close out this year’s frightening festivities, Paul and Arlo are breaking from the norm to discuss Emil Ferris’ 2017 graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. Joining them for this first Gobbledyween/Four-Color Flashback crossover is their The Deli Counter of Justice collaborator Eric Sipple. The gang marvels at Ferris’ stunning art (all done in ballpoint pen!), attempts to process the numerous threads in this first of two planned volumes (sexuality, duality, and reality, oh my!), draws unexpected parallels to Art Spiegelman’s Maus (a FCF entry just this past August!), and so much more (no parenthetical necessary!). We promise there are monsters.

Next: and I’m freeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, free Gooooobbliiiiiiin’.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:42:55

  • 00:00:44  – Intro
  • 00:03:20  – My Favorite Thing is Monsters
  • 01:36:51  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Wild Thing” by The Troggs, From Nowhere (1966)
  • “Good Monsters” by Jars of Clay, Good Monsters (2006)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek 388 – “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny)”

Patrice Jennings and Billy Warlock in Brian Yuzna’s ‘Society’ (1989).

Gobbledygeek episode 338, “Gobbledyween: Society (feat. Greg Sahadachny),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme: the rich have always sucked off the poor, and podcasting icon Greg Sahadachny has always joined Gobbledyween for the most ridiculous and outrageous pick of the season. This time, Paul and Arlo have chosen to torment Greg with Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society, which is a dumb teen sex comedy until–well, until it isn’t. The gang discusses the film’s subtext and/or screaming neon text; Screaming Mad George’s “surrealistic makeup effects”; how the movie surprisingly rewards repeat viewings; and the film’s unlikely parallels to Lynch, Friedkin, Polanski, and a whole buncha other pretentious arthouse weirdos.

Next: Gobbledyween comes to a close as Broken Magic author Eric Sipple joins us to discuss Emil Ferris’ graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:14:44

  • 00:00:45  –  Intro
  • 00:03:42  –  Society
  • 01:09:00  –  Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “The Eton Boating Song (feat. Helen Moore)” by A.D.E.W., Mark Ryder & Phil Davies, Society (Motion Picture Soundtrack) (1989)
  • “Society Is My Friend” by Kurt Vile, Smoke Ring for My Halo (2011)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 387 – “Gobbledyween: Near Dark (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

Bill Paxton in Kathryn Bigelow’s ‘Near Dark’ (1987).

Gobbledygeek episode 387, “Gobbledyween: Near Dark (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

It finally happened. After three long years of behind-the-scenes turmoil, Near Dark has made its way to Gobbledyween. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins Paul and Arlo to discuss Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampiric Western, which reimagined the creatures of the night as filthy, lowdown rednecks. The gang discusses the influence Near Dark has had on vampire fiction, the late great Bill Paxton’s immortal performance as Severen, the film’s surprisingly conservative stance on biological family, and how surprisingly difficult it is to get ahold of the movie these days.

Next: Gobbledyween lives in a society. Greg Sahadachny joins us to talk Brian Yuzna’s 1989 satire Society.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:33:05

  • 00:00:45  – Intro
  • 00:03:44  – Near Dark
  • 01:24:22  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Fever” by The Cramps, Songs the Lord Taught Us (1980)
  • “The Cowboy Rides Away” by George Strait, Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind (1984)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 386 – “Gobbledyween: The Cabin in the Woods”

Anna Hutchinson, Chris Hemsworth, Kristen Connolly, Jesse Williams, and Fran Kranz in Drew Goddard’s ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ (2011).

Gobbledygeek episode 386, “Gobbledyween: The Cabin in the Woods,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Leaves are on the ground, blood is on the screen. It’s time once again for Gobbledyween, that most beloved of Gobbledygeek institutions–and one that has not reared its horrific head in full since 2015! All month long, Paul and Arlo will be discussing horror or horror-adjacent movies, starting with one they actually discussed seven years ago: Drew Goddard’s mega-meta 2011 genre critique The Cabin in the Woods. The boys reveal why they’re revisiting the film (hint: it involves sheer incompetence!), break down Goddard and co-writer/producer Joss Whedon’s refutation of horror stereotypes, compare Cabin’s prevailing sense of nihilism to the pragmatic hope on display in Buffy and Angel, and go nuts trying to name all the monsters we see on screen.

Next: the night, it’s deafening. A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis joins us to discuss–finally–Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampire Western Near Dark.

THE BREAKDOWN

Total Run Time: 01:43:03

  • 00:00:35  – Intro
  • 00:11:12  – The Cabin in the Woods
  • 01:40:36  – Outro / Next

THE MUSIC

  • “Horror Movies” by Dickie Goodman (1961)
  • “Last” by Nine Inch Nails, Broken (1992)

THE LINKS

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 378 – “The Dog Ate My Sleep”

He only looks innocent.

Gobbledygeek episode 378, “The Dog Ate My Sleep,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

We’re tired. So tired. That’s what you want to hear when you’re about to fire up a podcast, right? You are reading this, aren’t you? Buried among such illuminating subjects as the coffee Arlo’s drinking, Paul’s underhanded behind-the-scenes manipulations, and the boys’ general unprofessionalism, there is indeed some pop culture palaver and parley. The boys are digging HBO’s troubled teens drama Euphoria despite being approximately 400 years too old to say things like “that’s a mood”; Arlo is losing faith in The Handmaid’s Tale; Paul remembers Yesterday; and they both are in awe of Toy Story 4 being so much more than a cynical cash-grab.

Next: Toby Maguire now vanquished, Jake Gyllenhaal finally makes his way into a Spider-Man movie, donning a fishbowl for Spider-Man: Far From Home.

(Show notes for “The Dog Ate My Sleep.”)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 370 – “Us: Down the Rabbit Hole”

Lupita Nyong’o in Jordan Peele’s ‘Us.’

Gobbledygeek episode 370, “Us: Down the Rabbit Hole,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

It’s 11:11, better grab your gardening shears and press play on this week’s Gobbledygeek, a discussion of writer-director Jordan Peele’s Us. This is a tricky one; it’s got more layers than a cake. Paul and Arlo discuss Peele’s extensive use of duality and mirroring, the awards categories they’re going to have to invent to honor Lupita Nyong’o’s tremendous performance, the film’s transitions between humor and horror, and what it all means.

Next: back to the void.

(Show notes for “Us: Down the Rabbit Hole.”)

Listen to Gobbledygeek Episode 367 – “Dentophobia”

Gobbledygeek episode 367, “Dentophobia,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

In which our daring duo defies devilish dentists. In all sincerity, here’s a big fat content warning: if, like Paul and Arlo, you are one of the 5-15% of adults with dentophobia, we talk about the dentist. A whole bunch. From childhood orthodontic nightmares to phantasmagoric periodontics of the present day, the boys discuss in (perhaps excruciating) detail their toothy troubles. Plus, if that doesn’t turn you off of the whole damn enterprise, there’s also talk of How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World in IMAX, Netflix’s take on The Umbrella Academy, and a belated discussion of seasons 2 and 3 of AMC’s Preacher adaptation.

Next: Higher. Further. Faster. Captain Marvel.

(Show notes for “Dentophobia.”)