Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 265, “Now the Fun Begins (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 265, “Now the Fun Begins (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Three men. One room. Now the fun begins. (Feel free to interpret that any way you wish.) Hitchcock Month continues, as A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis drops by to discuss 1948’s Rope, wherein John Dall and Farley Granger’s perfect murder is in danger of being unraveled by Jimmy Stewart; and 1954’s Rear Window, in which Stewart’s busted-up photographer spies on his neighbors, including a potentially murderous Raymond Burr. Paul, AJ, and Joe discuss the one-take gimmickry of Rope and how it translates the stage to screen; the homosexual subtext (or text) of that film; what Hitchcock had to say about voyeurs; and Hitch’s subversive casting of the all-American Jimmy Stewart.

Next: Hitchcock Month continues, as Wanna Cook? co-author Ensley F. Guffey discusses 1944’s Lifeboat and 1954’s Dial M for Murder.

(Show notes for “Now the Fun Begins.”)

Listen to ‘The Avatar Returns’ Episode 12

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The Avatar Returns episode 12 is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Yeah, let’s break some rules! We radically shift the format of the show this week [Editor’s note: no, we actually don’t at all] as we reach the penultimate episode of our Book Two podcasts with chapters 216-218, “Appa’s Lost Days,” “Lake Laogai,” and “The Earth King.” Paul defends Dai Li dickbaggery, AJ identifies with Azula in a really uncomfortable way, and Eric finally likes a Jet storyline. And in a new regular feature [Ed. note: again, not really], the boys pitch spinoff show ideas; AJ imagines the Avatar/Bone crossover, Suki and the Veni-Yan, while Paul reveals his plans for The Young Sweepy Chronicles.

Next: we close the book on the Earth Kingdom with chapters 219, “The Guru,” and 220, “The Crossroads of Destiny.”

(Show notes for The Avatar Returns episode 12.)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 264, “Two Is the Magic Number (feat. Aja Romano)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 264, “Two Is the Magic Number (feat. Aja Romano),” is available for listening or download right here or on iTunes here.

In years past, Paul and AJ have devoted month-long chunks of the show to Quentin Tarantino, modern film’s remix master; and Hayao Miyazaki, Japan’s animation master. For 2016, the boys are devoting February to another cinematic maestro: Alfred Hitchcock, the Master of Suspense. The first pair of films under discussion are 1943’s Shadow of a Doubt, wherein Joseph Cotten’s killer misanthrope shares blood (and a telepathic link) with young Teresa Wright; and 1951’s Strangers on a Train, in which Robert Walker commits a murder for Farley Granger and expects him to return the favor. Joining Paul and AJ for this double about doubles is Aja Romano, geek culture writer for The Daily Dot, who educates the boys on why these are her favorite Hitchcock films. The gang talks Hitchcock’s perfect mise en scene, why and how trains are important to the Master’s work, the films’ incestuous and homoerotic (not to mention vampiric!) undertones, and much more.

Next: Hitchcock Month continues as A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis confines the boys to one podcast for 1948’s Rope and 1954’s Rear Window.

(Show notes for “Two Is the Magic Number.”)

Listen to ‘The Avatar Returns’ Episode 11

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The Avatar Returns episode 11 is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

This week gets off to a weird start as AJ raises an existential question which, among other things, reveals Eric’s secret desire to totally mess up some random 16-year old kid’s life. Pretending we heard none of that, we move forward with Avatar Book Two. In chapter 214, “City of Walls and Secrets” the full splendor of Ba Sing Se finally begins to open up to us. We talk about the peaceful life Iroh and Zuko seem set to build for themselves here, while the Aang Gang are exposed to the ‘70s-era conspiracy element of the Impenetrable City as they cross paths with Clancy Brown and his Secret Police. And chapter 215, “The Tales of Ba Sing Se” impresses us with how well it manages to tell what are essentially six complete stories, including Def Jam Sokka going all 8 Mile, Momo’s graceful monkey dancing, and the heartbreaking homage to the late great Mako Iwamatsu.

Also, a listener ruins everything by pointing out our many errors. And there’s some controversy over who actually wrote the vignette “The Tale of Zuko.” (Note: there’s no controversy, Paul was just straight-up wrong.)

Next: our penultimate episode of Book Two brings us chapters 216-218, “Appa’s Lost Days,” “Lake Laogai,” and “The Earth King.”

(Show notes for The Avatar Returns episode 11.)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 263, “Wezzo of Tomorrow (feat. Wesley Mead)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 263 is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

As 2016 begins, it is more apparent than ever that Americans are badly in need of enlightenment. Paul and AJ have chosen the form of the Enlightener, and he is none other than everyone’s favorite wacky British neighbor, Wesley “Wezzo” Mead. Wezzo enlightens the boys’ American ears with talk of how his own country has fallen apart following last summer’s Labour election, the documentary series I’ll Have What Phil’s Having, how he simply could not endure The Revenant, and Don Hertzfeldt’s short film World of Tomorrow. Plus, AJ’s dying!

Next: Hitchcock Month begins with The Daily Dot writer Aja Romano joining the boys to discuss 1943’s Shadow of a Doubt and 1951’s Strangers on a Train.

(Show notes for “Wezzo of Tomorrow.”)

Listen to ‘The Avatar Returns’ Episode 10

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The Avatar Returns episode 10 is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

The Avatar Returns returns! We’re back, having survived our various chemically altered holiday adventures. And due to some odd digital episode numbering, we end up with a bonus chapter this week which we hadn’t anticipated watching yet. But perhaps it all works out for the best, since it turns out chapters 210, “The Library,” and 213, “The Drill” bookend this discussion with more action-oriented, event-based stories, whereas the two middle chapters, 211, “The Desert,” and 212, “The Serpent’s Pass” are transitional, getting-from-place-to-place stories. We talk about giant owl-faced dick spirits, Aang almost going all Anakin Skywalker on some dudes, AJ asks Paul to dance (it gets awkward), and we forgo the usual Buffy the Vampire Slayer comparisons in favor of our first Doctor Who, Tarantino, Princess Bride, and Lost references.

Also there’s a pop quiz!

Next: a short week to make up for this week’s surprise fourth chapter, we’ll be discussion 214, “City of Walls and Secrets,” and 215, “The Tales of Ba Sing Se.”

(Show notes for The Avatar Returns episode 10.)

Listen to the ‘Gobbledygeek’ Season 7 Premiere, “The Somewhat Disgruntled Four (feat. Ensley F. Guffey & Joseph Lewis)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 262, “The Somewhat Disgruntled Four (feat. Ensley F. Guffey & Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Don your dead general’s coat and strap on those snowshoes; for the Gobbledygeek season 7 premiere, we’re taking the last stage to Red Rock for a discussion of Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight. Bringing Paul and AJ up to a Somewhat Disgruntled Four are Wanna Cook? author Ensley F. Guffey and A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis. Ensley, a bonafide historian, teaches us how Tarantino plays with historical symbolism; while Joe, a die-hard Tarantino fan, tells us of the religiosity of his Hateful Eight 70mm experience. The gang also discusses the film’s handling of race and misogyny, how Tarantino borrows from The Thing, whether or not the film is a convincing mystery, and more. Plus, the boys pay tribute to the icons 2016 has already stolen from us.

Next: break out your scones, guv’nor. It’s time once more for the delightfully British Wesley “Wezzo” Mead to make his journey across the pond.

(Show notes for “The Somewhat Disgruntled Four.”)