Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 310, “Children of Men: This Stork Is Quite Tasty, Isn’t It?”

Gobbledygeek episode 310, “Children of Men: This Stork Is Quite Tasty, Isn’t It?,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Anti-immigrant sentiment. Militarized police. Fascist leadership. A Britain with closed borders. No, this isn’t our world circa 2017; it’s the 2027 of Alfonso Cuarón’s 2006 sci-fi masterpiece Children of Men. A world rocked by mass infertility and faced with humanity’s impending extinction has led down a path of violent extremism, one you and I may be traveling as we speak. Paul and Arlo discuss the film’s terrifying relevance, its rightful ascendance to modern classic status, those insane tracking shots, and, you know, white male privilege. Plus, Paul promised Arlo he would watch Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, and by god that’s a promise he kept.

Next: three years after their self-titled debut, the Guardians of the Galaxy are about to drop Vol. 2, and you’re invited to the listening party.

(Show notes for “Children of Men: This Stork Is Quite Tasty, Isn’t It?”)

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Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 306, “Unmaking Soup”

Gobbledygeek episode 306, “Unmaking Soup,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

This week, Paul and Arlo turn on and tune into the wonders and terrors of the superhuman mind by taking a gander at the first season of Legion. The FX series, developed by Fargo‘s Noah Hawley and theoretically set in the X-Men universe, is unlike most other superheroic media. David Haller is either schizophrenic, an extremely powerful telepathic/telekinetic mutant, or both. Witnessed through his eyes, the world is fractured, bizarre, disturbing, and a tad surreal. As such, the typical X-Men plot–David is rescued from a mutant-hunting government organization known as D3 by a group of rebels with a Magneto-esque leader–is given a swift kick in the pants. The boys discuss this inventive telling of a simple story, the show’s many visual flourishes, why it’s a powerful exploration of mental health, and Aubrey Plaza’s revelatory turn as a 50-year-old man. Plus, a surprise Rick and Morty pre-empts Samurai Jack, overjoying one of our hosts and causing considerable frustration in the other; and the boys rave about the fifth season of another brilliant FX drama, The Americans.

Next: film critic and horror expert Jess Byard joins Paul and Arlo to ask, “Where has all the good sci-fi horror gone?”

(Show notes for “Unmaking Soup.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 304, “Oh Hi, Superman”

Gobbledygeek episode 304, “Oh Hi, Superman,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

If only these walls could talk, the secrets they could tell. Among them: murder, betrayal, lies, infidelity, and how in the hell Tommy Wiseau made a movie. It’s time for another Geek Challenge, and Arlo has seized the opportunity to finally force Paul into watching Wiseau’s 2003 cult classic The Room. In turn, Paul has challenged Arlo to Sidney Lumet’s much more dignified 1982 crime comedy Deathtrap. The boys discuss the advantages of stage over screen, and vice versa; questionable acting, be it Dyan Cannon or Greg Sestero; homoerotic subtext (or maybe it’s just text); and, yet again, Arlo’s fascination with epically bad filmmaking. Plus, Paul got his ears blown out by the Alabama Symphony’s Led Zeppelin performance.

Next: Kenn Edwards joins Paul and Arlo for the next installment of their year-long Four-Color Flashback discussion of Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra’s Y: The Last Man. This time, the gang will talk Vol. 3: One Small Step.

(Show notes for “Oh Hi, Superman.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 296, “Swing Away (feat. Kenn Edwards)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 296, “Swing Away (feat. Kenn Edwards),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Armed only with a glass of water and his trusty baseball bat, Kenn Edwards of So Let’s Get to the Point invades the podcast this week to help Paul and Arlo kick off Gobbledyween 2016. This year’s month-long horror-fest gets off to a miraculous start with a discussion of M. Night Shyamalan’s sci-fi thriller Signs. After the runaway success of The Sixth Sense and the lukewarm contemporary response to Unbreakable, Signs is often considered the last film Shyamalan made before a precipitous decline; that is, when it’s considered at all. The gang gets to the core of what makes Signs a worthwhile film, including a question you may hear repeated about the other movies on this year’s slate: Is it a horror film at all? The boys also delve into Shyamalan’s exploration of faith, how the film functions as a response to 9/11, whether or not it’s okay to still enjoy a Mel Gibson performance, and more. Plus, Paul violently shames Arlo for not watching Luke Cage, and the mythical episode 300 is teased.

Next: Gobbledyween 2016 grows fangs for Kathryn Bigelow’s 1987 vampiric neo-Western Near Dark.

(Show notes for “Swing Away.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 269, “The Air Up There”

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Gobbledygeek episode 269, “The Air Up There,” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

When the apocalypse happens, wouldn’t you want to wake up in an underground bunker, shackled to a wall and pricked with a makeshift IV by none other than American screen luminary John Goodman? Well, cult icon-in-the-making Mary Elizabeth Winstead isn’t thrilled by her new circumstances, while the amiably bearded John Gallagher Jr. just wants everyone to get along. Paul and AJ, meanwhile, contemplate 10 Cloverfield Lane‘s connection to 2008’s found footage monster mash Cloverfield, debate its effectiveness as a psychological thriller, and stick up for child killers (wait, no, that’s just Paul). Plus, AJ’s dying. Again.

Next: Four-Color Flashback 2016 kicks off with a look at the first story arc of Matt Wagner’s Grendel, “Devil by the Deed.”

(Show notes for “The Air Up There.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 265, “Now the Fun Begins (feat. Joseph Lewis)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 265, “Now the Fun Begins (feat. Joseph Lewis),” is available for listening or download right here and on iTunes here.

Three men. One room. Now the fun begins. (Feel free to interpret that any way you wish.) Hitchcock Month continues, as A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis drops by to discuss 1948’s Rope, wherein John Dall and Farley Granger’s perfect murder is in danger of being unraveled by Jimmy Stewart; and 1954’s Rear Window, in which Stewart’s busted-up photographer spies on his neighbors, including a potentially murderous Raymond Burr. Paul, AJ, and Joe discuss the one-take gimmickry of Rope and how it translates the stage to screen; the homosexual subtext (or text) of that film; what Hitchcock had to say about voyeurs; and Hitch’s subversive casting of the all-American Jimmy Stewart.

Next: Hitchcock Month continues, as Wanna Cook? co-author Ensley F. Guffey discusses 1944’s Lifeboat and 1954’s Dial M for Murder.

(Show notes for “Now the Fun Begins.”)

Listen to ‘Gobbledygeek’ Episode 264, “Two Is the Magic Number (feat. Aja Romano)”

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Gobbledygeek episode 264, “Two Is the Magic Number (feat. Aja Romano),” is available for listening or download right here or on iTunes here.

In years past, Paul and AJ have devoted month-long chunks of the show to Quentin Tarantino, modern film’s remix master; and Hayao Miyazaki, Japan’s animation master. For 2016, the boys are devoting February to another cinematic maestro: Alfred Hitchcock, the Master of Suspense. The first pair of films under discussion are 1943’s Shadow of a Doubt, wherein Joseph Cotten’s killer misanthrope shares blood (and a telepathic link) with young Teresa Wright; and 1951’s Strangers on a Train, in which Robert Walker commits a murder for Farley Granger and expects him to return the favor. Joining Paul and AJ for this double about doubles is Aja Romano, geek culture writer for The Daily Dot, who educates the boys on why these are her favorite Hitchcock films. The gang talks Hitchcock’s perfect mise en scene, why and how trains are important to the Master’s work, the films’ incestuous and homoerotic (not to mention vampiric!) undertones, and much more.

Next: Hitchcock Month continues as A/V writer-director Joseph Lewis confines the boys to one podcast for 1948’s Rope and 1954’s Rear Window.

(Show notes for “Two Is the Magic Number.”)